My frontline journal will be on women and the new constitution in Zimbabwe. It will focus on women’s rights that need to be included in a new democratic constitution as spelt out by more than 200 women during a women’s conference on the Constitution making process held at a local hotel on 17 July in Harare. Zimbabwe is in the process of drafting a new people driven constitution as stipulated in Article 6 of the Global Political Agreement (GPA) between the Zimbabwe African Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) and the two Movement For Democratic Change (MDC) Formation. The new constitution will replace the 1979 Lancaster House Constitution which the country has been using for the past 28 years. The Lancaster House Constitution with its 19 amendments as of date has shortcomings and fails to address the rights of women such as economic, social and cultural rights. In addition, it does not protect women from violence and abuse. My frontline journal will provide readers with the prevailing situation in Zimbabwe and reflect the degree of participation of women in this process.

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Gertrude, This is a strong topic. I applaud the level of knowledge and research you already have on this important issue. Be sure to include your own journey in the story of the Zimbabwe's evolving constitutional process.

Remember, narrative is often our most powerful weapon as journalists. Remember to SHOW, and not just tell. Show us how women are not protected, share a story of a woman who has fallen through the cracks. Show us how women do not have rights -- what short stories can you tell us that will highlight this issue and make us understand?

You have so much passion, I'm sure this will not be a challenge for you.

I look forward to reading your Journal.

Don't hesitate to ask if you have questions or need any advice along the way.

Cristi

Hello Gertrude,

Wow, I second the comment from Cristi, this is indeed a very strong topic. I am most intrigued by your intent to educate your readers about the prevailing situation in Zimbabwe and the focus on the participation of the women involved in bringing about these very important and vital changes.

It, obviously, would be very powerful to explore the emotional landscape of the women who are at the forefront of bringing about such powerful change in your country. I am certain this will be very intense. I am inspired by your dedication in sharing this very important moment in the evolution of women's rights in Zimbabwe.

I will support you all the way, and offer feedback along the way.

Very Truly Yours,

Gretchen