World without Words

Ashleigh Lauren
Posted April 6, 2015 from United States

An article I wrote working as an English teacher with students from Central America who had moved to the United States.

https://ashleighbugg.wordpress.com/2015/03/27/world-without-words/

Some women had never learned to read and write in their first languages and this got me thinking about how I could use my own ability to read and write to change the world.

Thanks for reading ( and be thankful you can) :)

Comments 2

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Terry Mullins
Apr 07, 2015
Apr 07, 2015

Hello Ashleigh Lauren! Thank you for sharing your story. It resonates with me so much because I, too, love to read. And yes, I am thankful that I have the skill as well as the physical ability. The last year of my mother's life she lost her vision due to macular degeneration; she could not read anything. She had been a voracious reader her entire life and had instilled the love of the written word in each of her seven children. It was heartbreaking to see her sink into a depression from which she never recovered.

I am positive she and we, her children, did take it for granted that we had been taught to read at a very early age and that we were physically able to do so. I am certain none of us ever gave it much thought that there were adults around us who were living in a "world without words". To us that would have been unimaginable.

I agree with you that "literacy is not the cure-all of every social ailment" and that an illiterate person must feel some sense of loss if for no other reason than her life is, and always will be, limited.

I applaud your dedication to use reading and writing as a tool to empower your community. Thank you!

In love and peace,

Terry Mullins

Ashleigh Lauren
Apr 08, 2015
Apr 08, 2015

Dear Terry,

Thank you for sharing the struggles as well as the legacy of your mother. I think it is a special kind of parent who takes the time to read with their children. I'm thankful to my own mother for doing this for my sister and me as well as to my father who would make up his own stories for us. 

I'm sorry your mother lost her ability to read toward the end, but I know when you look at the story she told with the entirety of her life, this was only a short chapter in a long legacy of inspiring and encouraging others. After all, she helped seven other people have this gift!

Thank you for sharing your story and the story of your mother.

Best wishes,

Ashleigh