Let's Talk About the Vagina

denramonal
Posted February 5, 2021 from Philippines

I will keep this short.

"Let's Talk About" was first written and paired with an illustration I posted on Instagram of a nude woman laying down with her legs open. I think some people found it too 'straightforward' just to put it lightly. This video piece mainly aims to briefly talk about the vagina and its amazing capabilities outside the usual kinks that many people like to pervert it into. 

Comments 13

Log in or register to post comments
Jill Langhus
Feb 05
Feb 05

Hello Den,

How are you doing? Thanks for normalizing talking about, and also celebrating, the vagina. You have a soothing, lovely voice, by the way. Do you do radio, tv, or podcasts? Hope you're well and that you have a great weekend.

denramonal
Feb 05
Feb 05

Hey there, Jill. I am well and I hope you are too. I think we should talk about it like any other organ and avoid the malice that the topic is usually linked to. We have to continue what others have already started I guess. I only started making videos for my YouTube channel but have not done radio, tv, or podcasts. I might consider it in the future. :) Have a great weekend also.

Jill Langhus
Feb 06
Feb 06

Hello there:-)

Great to hear. Yes, I'm doing well, thanks.

Yes, I agree.

Okay, dear.

Thanks!

jomarieb.earth
Feb 05
Feb 05

Dear Denramonal,
The vagina, a wonderful subject! Your video is AWESOME!!! This brings me to introduce to you... The Vagina Monologues, a live performance play and book by Eve Ensler. It is about the vagina as a character in many situations, ethnicities, ages, locations, traditions and circumstances of women's lives. She does an eye-opening adventure into the last frontier, the forbidden zone, the vagina at the heart of every woman. It is enjoyed around the world. This groundbreaking book is lusty, factual, outrageous, poignant, and thoroughly human. With stories from many women, transforming the question mark hovering over the female anatomy into a permanent victory sign. She is responsible for V-Day. Valentine(love), Vagina & Victory Day. You would enjoy this book! It's now celebrating it's 20th Anniversary Edition. Check it out! You will love it!
Hugs...JoMarie

denramonal
Feb 06
Feb 06

Hi Jomarie,
Ah yes! The Vagina Monologues --- I was introduced to it when was in uni but I did not really pay attention to it much back then. It was when I saw the play that I started appreciating it. I remember Eve Ensler --- I saw her from a distance in an event in India (I was too scared to approach her now I am kicking myself). She was very much at the forefront of OBR (One Billion Rising) movement. I will definitely take your advice and read it! Thank you. :)

jomarieb.earth
Feb 06
Feb 06

Hello again Den...
I have a question that wrestles in my mind and I hope that Nini also has an opinion about this question. How do you think a woman that has been genitally mutilated can feel about crossing the threshold of embracing her vagina? Drawing it and feeling all that intricate wonderful details spoken on this page. What would her experience be? How can she be pulled into the conversation and allowed to be proud as well? The mutilated women have to overcome as well. I wonder how they could be included or even addressed?

denramonal
Feb 07
Feb 07

Hi Jomarie,
Thanks for raising these points. About your questions - I could not possibly say how she would feel or how her experience will be like (I think only she can speak for her feelings/experiences) but I imagine that it will be different nonetheless. Just like every woman's feelings or experiences are. FGM is riddled with complexities. There are so many variables (social, cultural, physical, etc.) to consider/weigh even when one is just thinking about it. During my fieldwork in Sierra Leone, I had the chance to listen to many women's stories about FGM and it is a sensitive topic to dive into. It is culturally embedded in many societies and the ones I was lucky enough to hear are divided about it, which I understand. I think what we all need to remind ourselves with is to not disregard/downplay the cultural lens of FGM (or any tradition for that matter) and to be mindful when understanding such traditions. Sometimes our own cultural standards can be barriers. We are all free to share, but it is up to those who we share with, to do (or not do) what they must with what was shared.

jomarieb.earth
Feb 09
Feb 09

You put it so eloquently, with sensitivity and responsibility. I believe that just this dialogue creates a possibility of welcoming inclusiveness. You are amazing Den.

denramonal
Feb 10
Feb 10

Thank you, Jo. You are too generous. I hope it will encourage dialogue, if not, reflection at least even at just a personal level. It can go a long way. You are amazing too for raising those points.

Nini Mappo
Feb 05
Feb 05

Hello Den,
You are such an artist! I'm just wondering, according to what you hope this info-graphic will accomplish, is it to talk about it generically, like in an anatomy class, do we talk about ours, or even vaginas of friends--the same way we'd talk about their hair or nose for example, and to whom, with whom, in what context, to what end....do you recommend we talk about the vagina?
Just digging for the story behind the story is all ;-)

denramonal
Feb 06
Feb 06

Hi, Nini. I love your questions. My goal is to encourage people to start talking about the vagina and not treat it like a taboo topic. I do not understand why 'vagina' is a trigger word for many, even amongst women. I know a lot of women friends who are uncomfortable with even saying the word in an audible manner and by audible, I do not mean loud or vulgar, like as if there was something dirty attached to it. It makes me sad because it is a very strong female organ (powerful even) and yet it is reduced to kinks, giggles, and whispers. I think people should start talking about it like how they talk so much about the eyes or hands, emphasize its anatomy and function, how it is connected to other organs, and talk about it in a respectable yet casual manner. I am thinking that if more people do so, then others will be more receptive to narratives about the vagina.

Nini Mappo
Feb 06
Feb 06

Ha I see. Yes that requires a massive change in culture, both internal and external. Perhaps being anatomy-correct instead of using euphemisms even while teaching children about their bodies could be a start. Interestingly, in teaching anatomy, what you have drawn is known as the vulva, of which the vagina(l canal) is part of, and therefore invisible. Perhaps our embracing with and embarrassment over the use of vagina as all encompassing of all the different parts of the vulva is to take part in its reduction to a mere sexual organ. I just created another myriad of questions in my mind ha ha

denramonal
Feb 06
Feb 06

Yes, I agree with the notion of being anatomy-correct especially when discussions about it are done with children. Massive massive massive cultural and behaviour change! I was actually thinking of what you mentioned about just drawing the vulva but when I was sketching it, I wanted the most obvious part to be seen and recognized. It is there but the vagina is so much more and webbed with inner complexities (artistic choice but would not recommend the drawing to be the base for anatomy lessons)! And yes, more questions are good signs, meaning the video did its job to get people talking/wondering. :)