Prevention of violence against women deem necessary

Erena Bayessa
Posted October 9, 2018 from Ethiopia

 In communities of Ethiopia, women/girls are victim of the prevailing social, economic, cultural, and political problems. This has resulted in complicated and multifaceted socioeconomic and health problems for the lives of many women in Ethiopia. The prevalence of violence against women in communities of Ethiopia further resulting to the high vulnerability rate of women or girls to unsafe sex, opportunistic infections and HIV/AIDS. HIV positive women do not disclose their HIV status for their husbands or partner and families fearing stigma and discrimination and driven out of home.   Therefore, continued advocacy to ensure gender equality is needed in Ethiopia.

Our women or girls are victim of the prevailing social, economic, cultural, and political problems persisting in the country. The problems include, but are not limited to, deep rooted; loss of quality life and dignity; loss of security and health; lack of economic capacity and capability; lack of alternative income generating means knowledge and skills; loss of property, absence of legal support; lack of education and protection. We call on stakeholders and institutions within existing community to engage to increasing their understanding of domestic violence and to take action within their personal and professional lives to support women’s right to live free of violence. Let us commit ourselves to establishing policies and protocols, in the community settings and places of work that upholds women’s right to non-violence. 

Comments 10

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jlanghus
Oct 14, 2018
Oct 14, 2018

Hi Erena,

Thanks for sharing your troubling story about the prevalence of violence in Ethiopia. I hope your wish that more institutions implement non-violence policies and procedures. I also hope that more awareness at home, in communities, and everywhere starts to occur more. Education starts at home with families.

Hope you're having a good day!

Erena Bayessa
Oct 14, 2018
Oct 14, 2018

Yes , you are absolutely right! For half a decade, my organization has been working to prevent both violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) from the approaches of adopted prevention model. We -trained community activists (CAs) were recruited from target beneficiaries, staff, health institutions, schools, local government authorities, religious institutions and community based organizations. In previous years, the CAs facilitated the implementation of the prevention model’s strategy and activities which engaged 5,000 community members to improve their skills to foster relationships between individuals and groups, and build solidarity and support for change among the members of the program community.
Currently, we are focusing on encouraging community members to use power to create safer, healthier and happier relations between women and men. The aim is to: encourage personal and public choices and changes towards balancing power in relationships; assist individuals, groups and institutions to sustain new social norms that support nonviolence between women and men; celebrate and recognize positive changes that contribute to an environment that supports healthy and safe relations, families and communities; and work closely with individuals, groups and institutions to create policies and practices that sustain positive change.
My organization and the communities volunteers working along my organization’s programme are promoting the benefits of nonviolence in relationships; encourage balanced power in relationships between women, men, boys and girls, showing reduced tolerance towards ignoring violence; put social pressure on men to be more equitable; provide support to activists speaking out and taking action on issues related to power, developing ways to encourage and sustain positive change in every segment of the project community. Our expectant outcomes of our ongoing programme will be supporting flexible gender and social roles; sharing decision making; sharing household responsibilities including child rearing; improving the quality of couple communication; respecting each other’s rights and power; making commitments not to use violence; and decrease in use or experience of all forms of violence.

We will continue recognize and celebrate changes as it happens within project staff, community members, activists, leaders, professionals and other stakeholders. Celebrating change encourages more change. Activities include: community dialogues, community theatre, impromptu discussions, and distribution of learning materials, booklet clubs, video shows, and development of various learning materials.
Thank you
Erena

jlanghus
Oct 14, 2018
Oct 14, 2018

Hi Erena,

Thanks for expounding on the excellent work your organization does. I'm very encouraged to hear it. What is you website and/or social media pages so that we can follow/like it?

Looking forward to seeing more posts from you.

Hope you're having a good day!

Erena Bayessa
Oct 18, 2018
Oct 18, 2018
jlanghus
Oct 19, 2018
Oct 19, 2018

You're very welcome, Erena. It's looks great. Thank you for sharing:-)

I'm looking forward to seeing more posts from you soon.

Veronica Ngum Ndi
Feb 22
Feb 22

Dear Erena
This is so thoughtful of you to share this story.GBV happens everywhere and all the time.The most important thing is that we should never get tired of speaking out and fighting to eliminate it
Thanks
Veronica
Cameroon

Kaity Van Riper
Mar 08
Mar 08

It is so awful what so many women must face just because we are women.

Jacqueline Namutaawe

Hi Erena those problems are everywhere for women though in differeing contexts but still the woman remains at the center suffering all kinds of problems. However we have to stand despite the fact that they weigh us down as advocates nevertheless women are still standing and the struggle towards ending violence continues.

Erena Bayessa
Mar 22
Mar 22

Dear sis. Salifu,
Greetings
Thank you so much for your response and question.
I would like to respond to your questions as follows:

According to Ethiopian health and demographic survey 2016, which was up-to-date available data, among women and men age 15-49 in Ethiopia, the HIV prevalence is higher among women than men (1.2% versus 0.6%).

Regards to measures being taken, along the national endeavour to prevent the transmission and acquisition of HIV, my organization alone has done as follows: Between 2008 and March 2019, the Project reached 41690 HIV/AIDS affected and infected women, children, grandmothers and vulnerable members of the community. Through HIV/AIDS awareness and skills building activities, 1,166 women living with HIV/AIDS were provided with palliative care and peer support; 445 grandmothers and OVC households with food support and capital provision to expand existing household businesses; and 1238 OVC with educational and psychosocial support. These interventions have enabled women’s leadership and participation; women contribute to community issues and cater to the needs of many deserving and poor members of their community. They have changed the perception of local stakeholders with regard to people living with HIV and have inspired other HIV positive women to embrace innovation and creativity. These efforts have reduced transmission of HIV and prevented violence against women (VAW).

The current proposed project for April 2019- March, 2020, will continue to work with People Living with HIV/AIDS through sustainable economic empowerment programming, health training and psychosocial support. In turn, the project will contribute to the effort of care and support program that provides for coordinated AIDS impact reduction and HIV prevention using the best mix of interventions, intervention targets, and intervention scale up to optimize the AIDS impact reduction whilst preventing new infections.

Thank you,
Erena

Sis. Salifu
Mar 21
Mar 21

Thanks for sharing your story. If I may ask, what is the rate of HIV/ aids infection among both men and women in your country?
Are there measures taken by organization to reduce this rate?
Regards