My Journey

Ese Ajuyah
Posted July 19, 2016 from Nigeria
My Journey

I am a Nigerian born into a family of five females a male. This posed as a major challenge for my father who was strongly inclined to intrinsic male dominated principles and practices. All we females grew up having to prove to our dad that males are not more valuable than us. I think perhaps this is one of the major reasons I find myself to be very vocal and want to assert my own personhood at all times.

A little wonder that I got involved in social work during my one year national mandatory service for graduates under the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) programme. I was one of the volunteers trained on HIV prevention among youth in the rural communities we were posted to teach in. This particular experience marked off my journey into the world of providing social service.

After the programme I joined my mentor who owned a female led organization that started the break the silence on child sexual abuse and rape campaign in Nigeria. This birthed my work and passion in helping women to find their voice in the society, Presently I am a counselor and assist women access help and information.

Comments 9

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Kaity Van Riper
Jul 19, 2016
Jul 19, 2016

You are doing amazing work! Wow, what a struggle to have to prove your worth. You are a strong woman. 

Ese Ajuyah
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

Thank you Kkrompas. Thank you for your kind words.

Sally maforchi Mboumien
Jul 20, 2016
Jul 20, 2016

Dear ESE I like your journey. Cultural taboo and patriarchy is the greatest night mare most African females have to live with

I wish you well in your journey for change.

Ese Ajuyah
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

Dear Masaliens,

You are so right. African females sure have a whole lot to deal with as a result of culturally imposed challenges.

Thank you for your words of encouragement. Ese

Pushpa Achanta
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

Dear Ese Ajuyah,

Hi. Happy to hear of your determined resistance to patriarchy and sexism that are sadly universal. May you keep touching more lives.

Love,

Pushpa

Ese Ajuyah
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

Thank you Pushpa. Ese

Mary Morgan
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

I am honored to read about your convictions and your journey.

Do you still have a relationship with your dad or your family, or did your views cause a painful rift? I admire your determination to be of service and to always work for something you believe makes the world better. 

What is your mentor like? Do you still keep in touch with her? Being a counselor is a good way to help lots of people but it must be very hard on you, too.

Thank you for helping other women to find their voice!

Ese Ajuyah
Jul 23, 2016
Jul 23, 2016

Hello Marycait,

Well my dad is late now. I actually did earn my respect with him overtime before he passed on. i am in strong contact with all my other siblings.

Yes I am also in contact with my mentor there are relationships that endure through the years and my relationship with my mentor is one of such.

I agree with you that counseling could be tasking, however i find pleasure in acting as a guide for other hurting and challenged women to access help. Its a pleasing way to live for me.

Ese

Leslie Stoupas
Jul 27, 2016
Jul 27, 2016

Dear Ese,

I am impressed by the hard work to which you have dedicated yourself, especially in a cultural environment that tries to keep women under the patriarchal thumb. It is difficult to see people who are suffering, but rewarding to know you have helped them. I am looking forward to hearing more about the work that you do!

Leslie