Oromo women's Struggle for freedom and equality

Giittuu
Posted October 11, 2016 from United States
Oromo women at Irreecha (Oromo Thanksgiving) festival
Oromo women dressed in cultural dress on their way to lake (Hora) Arsadi in Bishoftuu town about 50 km south of the capital, Addis Ababa .
Location of Oromia
Location of Oromia (1/3)

Hi all, my name is Giittuu.Originally I’m from Ethiopia, the country of 100 million population. Ethiopia is comprised of different ethnic groups.Ibelong to Oromo, thelargest ethnic group in Ethiopia.

My vision is to be a voice for the Oromo women who are suffering under the minority dictatorial regime of Ethiopia. The regime is killing the Oromo people who are struggling peacefully for their rights.

For more information about Oromo women/peoplehttps://twitter.com/kichuu24

Comments 4

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Sarah Murali
Oct 12, 2016
Oct 12, 2016

Hello Giittuu,

Thank you so much for this post and for calling attention to the situation of the Oromo community in Ethiopia. It is appalling what is happening, and very concerning that there isn't even more international attention being given to the situation.

I thought you might be interested in a special Call for Stories going on now around the topic "Peace in Our Lifetime." It's through World Pulse's Story Awards program, and its a way for your story to potentially reach a larger audience. If you're interested in participating and writing about what is happening in the Oromo community, the opportunity is open until October 27th. You can always share your own story in this open call for stories too!

The Editorial Guidelines page gives some good advice to help you get started writing your story.

I hope you will consider it! I know this story needs to be told. So glad to connect with you here.

Best wishes,

Sarah

Giittuu
Oct 15, 2016
Oct 15, 2016

Dear Sarah,

Thank you very much for your advice to use a special call for stories now around the topic “peace in our lifetime” through world pulse’s history awards program, draw attention to more audience the situation of the Oromo people in general and Oromo women in particular. I’m not a journalist or a writer by profession. My training is medicine. Currently I cannot travel to Oromia/ Ethiopia due to a political turmoil. Recently the regime has blocked social media and has declared “state of emergency” which stays on place for six months to intensify repression. 

On my previous travel to Oromia I had observed how land owners of Oromo farmers became landless. The regime invited transnational corporations to invest on the farmers’ land for commercial products like flowers, cotton, bananas, katt (kind of stimulant leaf), etc. The farmers lost their land without any compensation. The farmers also lost their lost their cultural identity, language and families. After losing everything they became hopeless due to lack of opportunities for jobs. Woman is a nucleus of a family in Oromia.

I’m planning to do something for the Oromo women and girls who lost their families, husbands, older brothers and mothers. First I and some Oromo diaspora women are trying to find ways to help those in need back home.  

Best Regards,

Giittuu  

Sarah Murali
Oct 17, 2016
Oct 17, 2016

Dear Giituu,

Thank you for sharing the struggles facing the Oromo community. It is clear they are facing serious injustices. I was not aware of the role of transnational corporations in this conflict. I would like to know more about this. 

I understand that you are not a journalist or writer by profession, but I still encourage you to share this important story through the Story Awards program. Most submissions do not come from journalists or writers -- the program is meant for everyone to be able to make their voice heard. If your story is selected for publication, it will be professionally edited by a member of the World Pulse staff, in collaboration with you.

I look forward to hearing more about what you are interested in doing for the Oromo women and girls you mentioned. Perhaps you have already seen the Resource Exchange on World Pulse. If you have not, it can be a great place to find partnerships and support for your ideas. You can look for mentors to offer help with specific skills, volunteers, funding, partners, and more. It can also help to write a story and share, within that story, a link to a post on the resource exchange in case others would like to get involved and support your work. Please send me a message if you have any questions about this!

In any case, I am glad you are here on World Pulse and I'm grateful for the perspective you are able to share. Wishing you the very best as you work to support Oromo women and girls who have lost their families.

In support, Sarah

Giittuu
Nov 01, 2016
Nov 01, 2016

Dear Sarah,

Thank very much for your comment. I found it is very encouraging in my journey to help the needy Oromo girls and women who have lost everything. I have a short term and long term plans

Short term plan: to be able to raise fund to feed their family and send the girls to school.

Long term plan: would be help these women to generate their own income by staring maybe a partnership business etc.

Giittuu.