Sharing the World Pulse Survey with local Ugandan Community whose Access to Internet is Limited.

Juliet Acom
Posted September 27, 2018 from Uganda

I took some time off to share the World Pulse "Security" survey with members in my local village whose opinions I feel matter to policy formulation but have limited access to internet and (Or) have limited affordability to a computer or smart phone and can't access electricity so they prefer analogue to smart phones because of battery longeivity 

Below is a summary of their responses, mostly translated from Ateso (A local Ugandan Language).

All respondents are Ugandans, all Africans, all are not world pulse members.

I have summarised answers.

1. John, Primary school teacher, 54 years - father of 11

How do you define security?

- Security means peaceful living, freedom from violence and ability to carry on business and other human obligations without worry that you will be stopped by violent people, natural calamities and sickness or death.

- I was once made insecure when there was a tribal conflict in northern Uganda and many northern tribes came to my village for refuge. They were followed here so I had to allow all my family members to undergo self defence training by the government. I was not happy that my wife, school going children including daughters now had to spend an hour in the morning learning how to use an arrow and bow (arrow boys and arrow girls). I hope we never go back to that time.

- The biggest priority and concern for my family when it comes to security is peace in the country and being able to afford basic education, food, health. Also protection from sexual predators for the under age children in my care. There are many mentally diaturbed people and alcoholic people who may pose harm to them.

2. Acaba, Orange fruit farmer, 38years, mother of 6.

- Because of cultural reasons, it is men who are mostly involved in discussions about security in my community. But now with more daughters going to school I believe that there will be more women involved in the discussions like we hear from the city dwellers.

- To feel more secure it is important for every one to have a peaceful government, a stable home from which to raise their family and to work hard to have a good income to raise their children well. It is important to raise a family in unity, many husbands prefer to drink after work and beat their wives.

- domestic violence, sexual and gender based violence are still common in these villages. Even among educated men. Alcoholic spouses make homes insecure.

3. Amado, 41, mother of 5, Orange fruit and cattle farmer.

- My culture does not allow for women to be fully represented in discussions about security. You have to receive information through your husband or adult male relatives. You can also pass your suggestions through them. Culture is slowly changing because there is now a call for women to join security committees in the villages by government.

- Those in power should introduce programs that promote security and peace. Last year there was a football  match at Masafu primary school.  I saw two rival families cheering the same side. They even shook hands yet the family feud had lasted years. Education and sport promote peace. Also these programs should include the disabled, I saw a boy who was born with a hearing impairment playing as goal keeper, I am happy that His parents allow him to go to school.

- Now days there are many women groups that teach about modern farming, saving money, dance and drama. I heard that during some meetings have someone teaching women how to stand up to domestic violence by involving the local authorities and police.

Note: Respondents were not open to having follow up questions but felt that their quotes  would help in policy formulation if shared.

This story was submitted in response to The Future of Security is Women .

Comments 11

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Karen Quiñones-Axalan
Sep 27, 2018
Sep 27, 2018

Hello, Juliet!

Kudos for the legwork in listening to your community who have no access to internet. Because of your time and effort, we can hear what security means to them. Thank for bridging the gap. Everyone has a right to be heard. I love you showed perspectives from a father, too.

There are more male policymakers in my country, too. It's about time that decision-makers invite women who are directly being impacted by issues discussed.

Thanks for sharing!

Juliet Acom
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

Hi Karen,

Thanks for taking the time to read my story and sharing your feedback.
Are there any steps being taken to ensure that more women join the decision making?
In my village we are still at that point of for every committee of 10 only 2women represent, usually one of them is the minutes recorder, but it's a steady progress

Jill Langhus
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

Hi Juliet,

What a great idea! That's awesome that these people had a chance to have their voice heard, and included in the survey. How many people were you able to have take the survey? I love that they are saying that progress is being made albeit slow:-) Thanks for sharing!

Juliet Acom
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

Thanks Jill,

In my village I talked to 6people as a group (2men and 4 women)
The responses are a mix of their thoughts, most of them were in agreement with the answers - one of the men was sure I am interviewing him for political reasons (despite my explanations), he said he didn't want his details appearing anywhere. The other two women preferred anonymity and seemed to agree with what their two friends were saying.

Was quite interesting because when you translate the survey questions to the local dialect - A one sentence question becomes a paragraph and takes alot of time being discussed☺

Jill Langhus
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

You're welcome:-)

That's great that you were able to help them voice their opinion. How come they wanted to remain anonymous?

Oh, yes. The questions are quite in depth, too, if I remember rightly.

Hope you're doing well?!

Have a great day!

Juliet Acom
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

Fear of the unknown, it happens alot with illiterate - semi illiterate communities.
They prefer visual communication (videos and pictures).

Am well Jill, enjoy your weekend

Jill Langhus
Sep 28, 2018
Sep 28, 2018

Oh, I see. Thanks for clarifying.

Good to hear:-) You, too!

Tarke Edith
Sep 29, 2018
Sep 29, 2018

Hi JUilet
They is nothing more degerous in life than when you live in fear of the unknown l know this because l am living in fear now sister because of the critics in our regions thanks for sharing

Juliet Acom
Sep 30, 2018
Sep 30, 2018

Hi Edith

That is sad to hear.
We pray that the situation changed very soon.
I hope you and your close people are safe.

otahelp
Sep 01
Sep 01

Hi Juliet, truly culture is changing because the world has began to understand that women are passing through insecurity issues and more over men are not always there to protect women and girls. and men are mostly the perpetrators so we must continue to add our voice through advocacy and enlightenment. thank you for sharing the update thoughts of your people. African must be liberated

Juliet Acom
Sep 14
Sep 14

You are right on this.

Thanks for taking the time to read my story