The Plague that spoke to me my role in the restoration of global peace and security as a woman.

khayimoti
Posted October 9, 2018 from Cameroon

Growing as every other going child on the globe, I had a tinge of excitement. It was so much fun having to play with my siblings in a safe space called home, in an environment void of insecurity. It felt so good to have my parents get my siblings and I ready for school, church, birthdays and other public functions. We were always under their watch. Days transcended to weeks, which elapsed to months, at last the years passed, and I budded into a wonderful teenager full of dreams. I aspired to become an entertainment celebrity. Security was the least of my burdens, as my teachers and other administrative staff were burdened with that task for me and everyone else, as it was the case in the Presbyterian boarding school I resided in as a student. My parents worried more, hoping their daughter doesn’t get involved in some peer pressure mishap, or physical abuse of some sort. Their worry at this level usually got intense during holidays, as I had to mingle with others of my age group in the neighborhood, actually a new one we had moved into, upon the beginning of my secondary school journey. We all were oblivious of the plague that was going to hit us in the years ahead.

My time in secondary school passed well, but I got enrolled into a public school now to pursue my high school education. Life here was nothing like the boarding school. It seemed more like  jungle to me, as everyone’s security depended first solely on their ability to exercise self discipline. I became exposed to a whole different kind of life. I made some friends, whom before I can think of blaming for a second now, for being the reason why I wrote my GCE Advanced Level exams thrice before I could make it to the university, I blame myself first!, for throwing away all the moral guidance and self discipline training I had amassed from a Christian boarding school and a decent home.

Eventually, I emerged a well groomed lady, entwined in the euphoria that comes with the obligations of attaining certain qualifications, worthy to meet the ranks of the elite class. This time around, I didn’t loose guard of my dreams and focus. Just like everyone else going about their business, I was busy with mine not until my community, a safe abode, becomes a breeding ground for armed militia, and a reason for radicalism, vandalism, and every other sort of violence imaginable to thrive. All credits to the unforeseen and unimaginable plague that had befallen us. I woke up daily to unending news about arbitrary arrests, rampant kidnappings, homelessness, rise in the orphaned population, economic stand still, social discrimination, and much more. More people were getting vulnerable and desperate over time. In effect to the occupation of a once secured and peaceful habitat by these monsters, insecurity and unrest became the order of the day. Peace seemingly became the most rarest commodity to find and most expensive to afford. 

I got trapped in a scenario, where I leave from home to work and back, having to balance the glaring realities with work obligations daily. It was either a helpless trader lamenting at her daughter who had been sexually assaulted, or her son who had now become a vandal, or a young man who has been toiling to earn a decent living weeping at the aftermath of a ruthless burglary, that has left him with nothing to hold on to. I couldn’t get through with a single routine hospital visit without seeing futures of young aspiring girls packaged and served to them at the maternity as teenage motherhood, and maybe future single parenthood, as a result of the crisis. The type which for some reason unexplainable seemed impossible to be managed by the government my community had elected as their own participation to nation building through exploiting their rights to exhibit their civic duties. I got caught up in live action on the streets, amidst a perturbed crowd on a rampage, scouting for a place to seek sojourn from perceived danger, from armed militia.

After surviving one of such runs, I took my stand to get involved in the conflict that had stolen lives and separated families. I decided I wasn’t going to be observing and lamenting from the side, but will be one of those monitoring and resolving in every way I can. “But how had racial discrimination and marginalization fanned a socioeconomic crisis, into a full blown sociopolitical crisis of this big a magnitude, such that numerous unending social problems now became the standard of living amidst the glaring insecurity and stability? How did things get here, at a point when you can’t express yourself because you can’t identify to a superior ethnicity? How could one be judged just because they are from an assumed low class society?”, I pondered endlessly. My journey as an advocate against clandestine behavior began. I got involved with several organizations, especially nongovernmental, that provides multiple solutions for direful cases. It dawned on me as a democratic citizen as I was expected to believe that maybe my government too needs me to do my part, as part of the government, to help them resolve this crisis. The decision to help my government, from the angle of managing social problems as a youth impact leader was made. Every opportunity available to make my voice heard and impact someone such that they can start dealing with the scars of insecurity and unrest was exploited to full capacity by me. My idea of possible solutions from a psychological point, the ability for the affected to understand their present state, to a mental point of consciously deciding to accept that they have to move forward, and above all actively themselves in their recovery process by first starting to share their stories (as a sign of courage to overcome the pain), became of utmost importance and top priority to me.

The voice of purpose sounded even clearer, as the media updated me constantly of other communities facing the challenge of insecurity and unrest because of racial discrimination and sociocultural misconceptions. I watched communities like Rohingyans and Micronesians, just to name a few, struggling daily to live in peace, undisturbed without being attacked either physically, emotionally, socially, and even mentally. I am currently exploring the impact of racial equity as a crisis management tool and eventually conflict resolution. I hope to see upcoming generations grow experiencing the same peace and security I had access to. This dilemma was the last strike that opened my eyes to fulfill my purpose as a racial equity activist, and the suffering it caused was the source of my passion. Amongst the sweetest achievements ever, has been the opportunity to share my story to the world, and then World Pulse comes along offering their platform for this purpose. I could never have felt happier at the consciousness that my idea stands a chance to reach other communities with a similar challenge. It is on this note that I call on everyone in any part of the world who has heard the purpose call to join me restore global peace and security in their own way. My journey to restore global peace and security starting from my community through racial equity as a woman just began.

This story was submitted in response to The Future of Security is Women .

Comments 13

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khayimoti
Oct 09, 2018
Oct 09, 2018

It takes a new experience to get a revelation about what your next assignment is.

Jill Langhus
Oct 10, 2018
Oct 10, 2018

Hi Khayimoti,

Thanks for sharing your passionate story. I'm glad you have found your purpose. I'm looking forward to seeing how it unfolds for you. Do you have a website and/or social media page(s) that you would like to spread your vision/mission with and to get more collaborators, or where are you in the process?

Hope you're having a great day, and good luck with your submission.

khayimoti
Jan 06
Jan 06

Hello JLANGHUS, going through my activity log, it was so motivating reading your comment. I actually got involved with a young NGO and we've worked so hard and built it such that we just launched our hospice care program, and we are in the process of setting up a vocational training center to aid the internally displaced, disadvantaged, vulnerable, and also people trying to recover from the trauma of gender based violence, that has been caused by the crisis in the English speaking part of the country. It hasn't been an easy journey, but we are still putting the necessary resources together hoping to go operational in February.
Pls ma'am you can find us on Facebook with the name "Together for Youths Association", and see more.
Thanks very much for the interests

Jill Langhus
Jan 07
Jan 07

Great to hear, dear!

Thanks for the update. Sounds like you're doing some very important work there. Thanks for letting me know what is the name of your NGO. I'm following it now on FB. Looking forward to seeing more updates from you on your progress. Good luck with the official launch.

Hope you're having a good/safe day!

khayimoti
Jan 12
Jan 12

Thanks so much ma'am. We shall endeavor to update as often as we can so you can see how far we are going in the days ahead. Due to the instability/insecurity here in our regions which is making us see officially opening in February as impossible, we decided to get a WhatsApp group where all our aspiring students for the February session can have access to free online trainings in things like Volunteering, servant leadership, and many more. Pls share our story, and i hope we can have people willing to tutor these students for us as a way to support our vision. Ma'am please kindly let me know if you come across any such person willing to Volunteer as a tutor for us.

Thanks for the encouragement, its the fuel to my car called Zeal. Stay blessed Ma'am and enjoy the rest of your day

Jill Langhus
Jan 13
Jan 13

You're very welcome, dear:)

Oh:( I'm sorry to hear your official opening isn't happening now:( That's a great idea about the Whatsapp group.

What sort of tutors are you looking for? Are you looking for online tutors, in person tutors, or both?

You too, dear. Hope you stay safe and are having a good day!

Corine Milano
Oct 24, 2018
Oct 24, 2018

I am so glad you found us here at World Pulse, and that you have shared this story with us. I do hope you will continue to speak out and update us on your ideas, challenges, and progress toward your vision of a world where all have access to the love and warmth and secure world you grew up in. Thank you for joining us and welcome!

khayimoti
Jan 06
Jan 06

Thanks soooo much ma'am for encouraging me. Its quite a motivation for me

Tamarack Verrall
Dec 12, 2018
Dec 12, 2018

Dear Khayimoti,
Your embracing of the role and the work of a racial equity activist is such an important, strong and effective base to work from. This term speaks volumes. I love that you have developed your work within the distress within your own country, and at the same time expanded this role to embrace everywhere globally that discrimination based on race is happening. I share with you a joy of finding WorldPulse and being able to find each other here, to be informed by and to work alongside each other.

In sisterhood,
Tam

khayimoti
Jan 06
Jan 06

Thanks soooo much Ma'am

Ngala Nadege
Dec 19, 2018
Dec 19, 2018

Thanks for sharing.

khayimoti
Jan 06
Jan 06

Thanks so much for reading

Awah Francisca Mbuli

I see myself in your story, just some slight differences. I applaud you for going through all.
God bless you my Hero.