Access to Education for All

Lumbiwe Lulu Limbikani
Posted December 22, 2016 from Zambia

I have always loved school and learning new things. My first years of primary school, I sat on the floor with around 60 other children. Even though I lost both my parents at an early age, I progressed fairly in school until my university days. When in my first year of university, I fell pregnant and had to stop school. I stayed home for a year and realised I had to do something to take care of this child I had whilst my baby's father was still in school. I had little to no money and realised that access to an education was the only way out of my situation. I reapplied to go back to University and was lucky to get scholarship. I became a teacher and devoted. I have seen first hand the value of education and devoted to promoting and supporting access to education for all. I now run a non-profit organisation called Cumacatu that advocated for children's rights to education and empowerment of women and girls through mentoring, financial literacy training. The organisation is currently piloting a back to school programme for girls in rural areas that have dropped out of school due to pregnancy or early marriage, an issue close to my heart that I would like to address. We are engaging the community and working with them to raise awareness on sexual reproductive health and the importance of keeping girls in school. We are being supported by local leaders in the community with the goal of breaking the poverty cycle by having more girls complete secondary school and as many to proceed to tertiary education. We are currently looking for funding to successfully implement the programme.I have always loved school and learning new things. My first years of primary school, I sat on the floor with around 60 other children. Even though I lost both my parents at an early age, I progressed fairly in school until my university days. When in my first year of university, I fell pregnant and had to stop school. I stayed home for a year and realised I had to do something to take care of this child I had whilst my baby's father was still in school. I had little to no money and realised that access to an education was the only way out of my situation. I reapplied to go back to University and was lucky to get scholarship. I became a teacher and devoted. I have seen first hand the value of education and devoted to promoting and supporting access to education for all. I now run a non-profit organisation called Cumacatu that advocated for children's rights to education and empowerment of women and girls through mentoring, financial literacy training. The organisation is currently piloting a back to school programme for girls in rural areas that have dropped out of school due to pregnancy or early marriage, an issue close to my heart that I would like to address. We are engaging the community and working with them to raise awareness on sexual reproductive health and the importance of keeping girls in school. We are being supported by local leaders in the community with the goal of breaking the poverty cycle by having more girls complete secondary school and as many to proceed to tertiary education. We are currently looking for funding to successfully implement the programme.

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LillianVB
Dec 29, 2016
Dec 29, 2016

Lulu, what an inspiring story of persistence, resilience and hope! For many young girls and women in Africa, we quite often recognize the challenges of growing up through our own experiences and this makes us better advocates for girls and women's rights, better leaders and mentors. This gives us the opportunity to inspire many other up-coming young leaders. Your story is very inspiring and I hope that you can find funding to continue your good work. Your resilience, persistence and hard work have definitely paid off.

JulieG
Feb 05, 2017
Feb 05, 2017

Dear Lulu,

Your personal journey is one of perseverance and resolution and it's very inspiring.  I am really looking forward to reading more from you as you begin your ADC training.

Warmly,

Julie

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