The day Illiteracy Lost Grip of One More girl

mamaAfrica
Posted March 16, 2009 from Kenya
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On Monday 16th March 2009 is yet another day that illiteracy lost in the battle of holding women captive. This is after 18 year old Naomi Joined form one ( juniour high school) at Mwereni Secondary School in Kwale District; Kenya.

Naomi had earlier this year dupped by her father and brothers to Join a cousin living in Mombasa with claims that she would take her to school, only to be sold out as a househelp. After learning that her sister Christine (20) had joined school the previous week courtesy of Project Africa; Naomi ran away from her cousin's place and sort refuge and help from Project Africa's coordinator in Lungalunga Ms Judy wanjira.

Soon after was Naomi's the report on my desk. my advice and help was awaited by the team in Lungalunga. And since the nearby school was already ful of admission, I requersted that an alternative be found if not Naomi should be counselled to accept a repeat of class eight at a local primary. For her age I imagined the mockery that she may have faced for being probably the oldest in class in the primary school. But thank God that Our Project Leader is a woman who has herself gone through alot of pain in life and could not stomach seeing Naomi drop out of school. Soon She was out demanding help from the local authority and the professional career people in remote Lungalunga and the local councillor offere to talk to a head teacher of Mwereni Secondary school which is 25 kilometres from Lungalunga that is where Naomi is a proud student today.

Where did the school fees come from, Project Africa in lungalunga started a small village bank giving small emergency loans of up to ksh 1000 equivalent to USD 12.5 to any villager in need with condition of a 10% interest upon payment. The Loan fund started late last year and was able to raise school fees for Naomi and two other girls Christine ( Naomi's sister) and Rose.

The fund was not enough to buy uniform and boarding fee for first tern leave alone buying Naomi personal effects like soap to shower and sanitary towels or even pens. But The Project Leader Ms wanjira was out again mobilising the community to help Naomi go to school and another Ksh 700 was raised.

As I write this feature Naomi is now in school Next week will take care of itself like this week has and it is my hope that Naomi will successfully complete her studies four years from now. If the Lord keeps us alive then we shall share in her joy.

In the meantime, lets have a look at the photo on this article. This was shared by a good friend of mine from Aid Africa a non profit working to improve livelihood in Africa (www.aidafrica.net). The Photo is a signpost of a girls' school in Gulu in Northern Uganda. The content is self explanatory. A Girl who fails to go to school is over burdened with responsibilities, chores and ignorance. That is bondage and today Naomi has escaped that kind of bondage.

If one girl is sent to school, a family, a community and a nation are educated as well. Let's not get wearied in our fight for every girls right to education. This is a noble course. Illiteracy must loss grip of all our sisters. Say No to illiteracy, say No to Bondage. send a girl to School

Comments 5

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Ruthi
Mar 16, 2009
Mar 16, 2009

I just read your article about Naomi-what a wonderful success story. Even here in the UK I work with a lot of young women who can't read or write, however not because they can't afford education, but because they find themselves under pressures such as teenage pregnancy, drugs or alcohol abuse. Lack of confidence, peer pressure, and unreachable fantasy media images of "perfect" celebrities all contribute to girls feeling inadequate which in turn makes them vulnerable. They lose out on education- the most valuable resource a young woman can have to gain independence and control of her life and find fulfilment through being able to choose her own destiny! I admire the work you do helping young women into education! It sounds like an arduous task, but I agree with you-the outcome is worth every ounce of energy put into the battle!!

Ruthi
Mar 16, 2009
Mar 16, 2009

I just read your article about Naomi-what a wonderful success story. Even here in the UK I work with a lot of young women who can't read or write, however not because they can't afford education, but because they find themselves under pressures such as teenage pregnancy, drugs or alcohol abuse. Lack of confidence, peer pressure, and unreachable fantasy media images of "perfect" celebrities all contribute to girls feeling inadequate which in turn makes them vulnerable. They lose out on education- the most valuable resource a young woman can have to gain independence and control of her life and find fulfilment through being able to choose her own destiny! I admire the work you do helping young women into education! It sounds like an arduous task, but I agree with you-the outcome is worth every ounce of energy put into the battle!!

phylis
Mar 16, 2009
Mar 16, 2009

I am so happy to hear what Aid Africa is doing to our women and girls. Long live Aid Africa. It is quite a shame that Naomi's cousin is a woman. l thought we were supposed to be there for each other and support one another to overcome the inequality that is spread all through us. Thank God Naomi is a bright girl who had the will to go back to school and therefore, took the bold step to run and seek for assistance at Aid Africa. l think we as women should come out and help this organization to be able to offer assistance to the less fortunate girls.

We can always be contributing anything small that we can to enable it to continue with the good work that they are doing. What do you think?`We can do wonders with the little we have to offer. Better less than none. Mama Africa thanks for the good work that you are doing. May God bless you and long live Aid Africa

lourdelullu
Mar 17, 2009
Mar 17, 2009

I'm touched by the true-to-life story you are telling us. Our society is so idealistic, yet so cruel to allow their ideals to stop just in them. The affluents set a standard that makes them far and far from the rest of majority, making them more unreachable. it pains us to know that there are still girls and boys, and housewives who remain isolated from the mainstream society by virtue of their illiteracy. Despite efforts of the UNESCO's Education for All programs, many are still wallowing in ignorance and poverty. What we want in this forum ... net voices of women is to come up with a global scenario through our voices and true stories that have been shared. together we can make the world move for the benefit of those whose situation has ignored by those who are in the position of power. Let's not waver in our desire for a better society.

Reena Shah
Mar 25, 2009
Mar 25, 2009

What you do is very commendable. Congratulations and keep up the good work.