Initiative Update

Leading an African Campaign to Destigmatize Mental Illness

Marie Abanga
Posted October 15, 2020 from Cameroon

We have each had a moment or the other where our mental health has been challenged. For some like myself, this was not only a moment or the other, but a series of traumatic events which greatly messed us up and earned us an illness labelled with one fancy name or the other. 

Sadly I must say, this label also known as a diagnosis, has attracted a lot of stigma from a world which is quick to shun all what it can't understand or 'accept', as shameful and embarrassing warranting a 'shut up' by the likes of myself.

Stigma is a Greek word meaning mark, cut or burn into the skin, to identify criminal slaves as polluted and shunned in public. However, in a simple term stigma are classed as being represented for persons who are usually excluded from society due to a condition they themselves did not choose or over which they may have little control over, thus suffer from “existential stigma”; such as sexual identity, mental retardation or even in such cases, marital status.

Various types of stigmas exist related to mental health, and some of the most recent research, along with Nicole Overstreet from Clark University, has revealed a Model that includes each of these types: (a) Anticipated Stigma: Expectations that others will react in stigmatising ways if they find out about stigmatising identity; refers to people’s belief that others will discriminate against or socially reject them; (b) Internalized Stigma: The extent to which people come to believe and endorse negative and stigmatising views about themselves (i.e., based on views that are perpetuated in larger community); (c) Enacted Stigma: Perceptions of discrimination and prejudice experienced from others, as well as the extent to which people feel they have been the targets of others’ prejudice (e.g., negative comments, public humiliation, being denied housing, physical threats); (d) Cultural Stigma: Ideologies that delegitimize experiences of mental condition suffers (e.g., the belief that GBV victims provoke their own victimization), as well as the ways that negative beliefs and stereotypes about mental health at the societal level influence the experience of victims of stigmatization at individual and interpersonal levels; (e) Perpetrator Stigma: Stigmatizing messages directly from one’s perpetrator, which can include emotionally, verbally, and/or psychologically abusive actions that perpetuate the stigma surrounding mental health.  

It is all of such Stigma that I led my fellow peers of the Global Mental Health Peer Network - African Region, to come up with this campaign. Our campaign is making rounds and has been viewed the world over since it was shared by all of us in the GMHPN and picked up by other partner local and international organizations. As the elected Regional Representative, this project was one I initiated and championed and am so proud of sharing it as an initiative update in destigmatizing mental illness.

 

How many people have you impacted since your last update?

10000

Comments 10

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Jill Langhus
Oct 16, 2020
Oct 16, 2020

Hello Marie,

How are you doing? Thanks for addressing mental illness stigmas and for sharing your campaign. I hope you're well and having a good week.

Marie Abanga
Oct 20, 2020
Oct 20, 2020

Dear Jill,

Thank you so much. I am doing fine. I am so happy to be doing all I do ad having such avenues to do so.

Jill Langhus
Oct 21, 2020
Oct 21, 2020

Hello there:-)

You're very welcome. Glad to hear it!

Hope you have a good, rest of your week!

Nini Mappo
Oct 17, 2020
Oct 17, 2020

'We are all mad here' ha ha :) Humour is a good way of breaking through into uncomfortable topics. Many people won't forget that catch phrase. Vey creative approach, Marie.

Marie Abanga
Oct 20, 2020
Oct 20, 2020

Dear Nini,

Yes that was my intention hahahahahahaha

maeann
Oct 19, 2020
Oct 19, 2020

Helo Heloo Marie :)

You are such an inspiration!

These words kinda tounge twister to me, its hard to pronounce Demystifying and Destigmatizing (hahaha)

I admire you with your fight!

Thank you for the updates.

Marie Abanga
Oct 20, 2020
Oct 20, 2020

Dear MaeAnn,

Thank you hahahahaha. I hope the tongue twisting was such fun hahahahahaha

maeann
Oct 20, 2020
Oct 20, 2020

it is fun been laughing when reading it

Karen Quiñones-Axalan
Oct 27, 2020
Oct 27, 2020

Hello, our dear mental health expert Marie,

Thank you for doing what you do! I look forward to listening to your talk this Thriving Thursday. We're proud of you, dear. I'm happy to call you a World Pulse sister. :) Keep it up!

Marie Abanga
Oct 30, 2020
Oct 30, 2020

Dear Kaye,

Thank you so much. I am so happy to be living out my purpose and passions this way and be appreciated this way.
You are such an encourager expert, am so happy to call you a sister too
light and love
Marie