Men's Issue. Part 1.

NNANE NTUBE
Posted June 3, 2019 from Cameroon
No! To Negative Masculinity. This is an extract from my story, Men's Issue.
No action is normal these days. It's not because a man keeps beating you that makes you think he loves you. Beating is not a synonym to love.

“Come here!” “Come here!” Papa shouted.  Mother had just got out of the room running, face draped in tears, mucus running uncontrollably down her lips. “I’ve asked you to come here. If I say it one more time, you will get the worst from me,” Papa told mother in an unusual stern voice. Mother stood beside the main door of the house which was widely opened but could not dare run out. Papa knew she couldn’t dare. Papa had his black belt firmly wrapped round his fist, the other part of it swirling in the air as he gesticulated.  “Where is she?”  “Where is that stupid woman?” he continued, moving restlessly in the parlour. I was studying in the parlour when the noise started but this had become music to my ears. I had resolved not be involved in their little disputes but Papa’s dark face at that moment did not leave me indifferent. I closed my books, walked towards him, stretched my right hand to calm him down, but he jumped on the sofa striking the black belt behind it. Mother wailed from behind it. “Devil!!! So, you think I won’t notice you!” Papa threw his hands behind the couch and pulled mother up. Mother’s bra was falling off her chest as the blouse she wore was destroyed. He pulled her by the side of the couch, punching her hard on the back with his fist. Mother fell on the floor, papa kicked her on the belly. She rolled and rolled and rolled, the edge of her wrapper got hooked on the stool I was using to study. That was how mother found herself in her birthday suit.

            Mother used to be a very beautiful and a jovial lady when I was four. I could remember it as if it were yesterday. Our house was a place to be. Mother’s sweet perfume and charming voice were everywhere‒they were my morning muse, my afternoon motivation and my evening aspiration. She was very intelligent. For a reason I didn’t know mother and I moved to the village at Bangem to live with grandpa and grandma. Papa would come from time-to-time to visit us, mother would let me go and greet him. Papa would sit in the parlour with grandma and grandpa discussing in low tunes, I could hear them calling mother’s name in their discussion. I heard grandma mentioning something about papa letting mother to work. Mother used to leave the house very early in the morning for work but for some reasons, she stopped. I never saw her leave the house, unless she wanted to buy maggi or some household necessities from a nearby store. The day she went to see off her friend and came back after papa had returned home from his jobsite, she knocked on the open-door tremblingly.  “Don’t cross that door!” papa yelled from within. That was the law and mother needed to obey till further notice. Papa stood up and slammed the door behind him.      

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Comments 21

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Hello, Nnane,

How are you today? I can’t imagine how traumatic it was for you to witness physical and emotional abuse done to your mother.

I’m sorry that your mom became a fearful woman and lost her jovial spirit. How is she today? Thank you for sharing your story of domestic violence so vividly. You’re a great storyteller. Please keep writing.

Hugs

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Hi Karen!
I'm doing great. Thank you. Hope you too.

Thank you Karen. My mother is 66 today and doing well. It's for her that I am writing the above story. It's kind of a recollection of memories. Thanks dear.

Hello, Nnane,

You’re welcome. I’m happy that you’re mother is doing well today. That’s a relief! Good for you to share this story about your mom. It does raise awareness on domestic violence.

Please keep posting more! You’re really a great writer and I enjoy reading your story.

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Thanks a bunch Karen. I'm grateful.

You’re welcome, dear.

Jill Langhus
Jun 04
Jun 04

Hi Nnane,

Thanks for sharing your sad and painful story, dear. I agree with Karen about being a great storyteller. I do hope that you haven't perpetuated this violence in your relationships? I also hope that your mom is once again jovial? I'm looking forward to hearing about Part 2.

Lisbeth
Jun 04
Jun 04

My dear Nnane,
I must admit that you are a very great writer. You got the ability to paint a vivid imagery in your writing. When I was reading, it was that skill of yours that made me enjoyed reading your article. I read it twice because I love to read over. That is amazing.
Now as regards the content, am not proud of what you went through as a kid. Every kids needs a very peaceful home or environment to live in order to developed or grow healthily with emotional balance. Yours was different and I am sorry you went through such.
However, I observed your upbringing did not affect you that much which is very good. You have grown to be a beautiful lady and a skillful writer. Bravo! I am looking forward to read more of such amazing posts. Hope you are doing very great?
Warm regards

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Thank you dear Lisbeth. My writing is influenced by my skills in poetry. I'm glad you enjoyed the read.

Well, at some point I felt downcast but quickly recovered as I started interacting with people who gave me reasons for being a woman I am today.

Lisbeth
Jun 05
Jun 05

Lovely, it good we associate ourselves with people who will encourage us positively in difficult times. Good you realized that quickly.
Take care

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Thanks a bunch Lisbeth.

Jun 05
Jun 05
This comment has been removed by the commenter or a moderator.
NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Hi Jill.
Thank you. I am a poet though I sometime write stories. The above is a recollection of memories of my childhood. My mother is a jovial person today.
Haha.. I'm a gender activist. I can't exerce such in my relationships but to be on the lookout.
Thanks. Part two will be coming pretty soon.

Jill Langhus
Jun 05
Jun 05

Hello dear,

You're welcome! Okay, great.

Oh, that's so good to hear about your mom!

And, very excellent news that you haven't perpetuated that pattern, and that you help others to not get involved in it too! I'm impressed and inspired, dear, to hear that:-)

Looking forward to it!

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Thank you Jill.

Jill Langhus
Jun 06
Jun 06

You're welcome, dear!

Hope you have a good, safe day!

maeann
Jun 04
Jun 04

Hi Nnane,

Good day! I'm sorry to hear about your Mother. Thank you for the courage of sharing your story.

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

Hi Maeann!
Good morning from Cameroon.

Thank you so much. It's a pleasure to share my story with you all.

Marie Abanga
Jun 05
Jun 05

Sis o,

We are in this together. I am a writer and activist too, but some stories take lots of appropriate words again and all I think of doing is using my hands...God forbid

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 05
Jun 05

[smiles]

Wow! That's good to know I understand it isn't easy at times. Let's connect.

Z.Elias
Jun 06
Jun 06

Hello Nnane,
I must admit that you are a strong women to share your story with us, yes I todelly agree with you violence is never synonym of love, and this definitely have to stop right away, every woman should have a balanced life where she is respected and considered as an effective member in the society.
I encourage you more to talk about it, because we should spread awarenes about domestic violence and fight against it.
Thank you.

NNANE NTUBE
Jun 09
Jun 09

Thank you dear sister Elias. Warm greetings to you.