Human Rights-a hope for many and a reality for some.

Odion Anavhe
Posted March 13, 2015 from Nigeria
The hope in my eyes
#IWD
Theodora Anavhe Adamu Foundation (TAAF)
Theodora Anavhe Adamu Foundation (TAAF) (1/1)

Aisha is a 50 year old woman who has never been through the four walls of a school. To her, human rights means total submission to her husband which includes all forms of domestic and social violence. But can you really blame her? How can she be aware of her rights when all she has known is hardship, been married at the age of 13, overwhelmed with poverty and pushed to hawk to fend for herself, her kids and her husband. Is there really a thing as human rights or does human right have a lot to do with ones social and economic status? Imagine if she was up there in the economic pecking order, would things have been different? The higher one is at the top of that order the less one is even aware of the need to have rights. Because the world makes sure that your rights are taken care of naturally. To these set of people, human rights is a reality. But the lower down the pecking order one is, the less rights one is able to access whether it is rights to clean water, good and quality reproductive health, physical safety in one's community from one's family, from one's government, or just the rights to the air one breathes. To these set of people, human rights remains a hope. One's access to rights and violations of rights are a function of the accident of where one is born and whether you're born a boy or girl. As the whole world comes together to celebrate women once again, let’s make it happen for young girls who are trodding the path of Aisha-girls who were born down the pecking order and whose rights the world will naturally not take care of. How can we make this happen? We can do this by empowering young girls, providing them with information and educating them to stand for their rights and take their lives in their hands. A human rights perspective demands that we recognize that providing education for girls, for example, is not only a good development decision but also a question of justice, of individual rights. It leads us to see that tolerating sexual abuse is not just a bad economic choice, in terms of health costs, but also a violation of a woman’s right to bodily integrity. A human rights view reveals that maternal mortality is not only a tragedy because it deprives children of a caregiver but an abrogation of the right of a woman to basic health care. If you Empower and Educate a woman, you Empower and Educate a nation. Together, we can make it happen for young girls and women.

Comments 6

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Yvette Warren
Mar 14, 2015
Mar 14, 2015

Very nice tribute to Aisha and to all our sisters across our shared earth. 

I sincerely believe this:

“No peace among the nations without peace among the religions. No peace among the religions without dialogue between the religions No dialogue between the religions without investigation of the foundation of the religions.”

― Hans Küng, Christianity: Essence, History, Future

I am hoping to have many voices from World Pulse sisters to take with me to the Parliament of the World's religions in October. 

I am certain that this October, in Salt Lake City Utah, USA, we will make known to the world that women's voices matter in all things. I am acting as an ambassador to the 2015 Parliament of the World's Religions http://ParliamentOfReligions.org. For the first time, this year, the parliament is having a "women's initiative."

In addition to asking my WP sisters and brothers to consider attending the parliament, I am working with World Pulse Sister Zeph https://www.worldpulse.com/en/community/users/sister-zeph, SHEROES United http://www.sheroesunited.org/, and One Billion Rising http://www.onebillionrising.org/events/women-of-the-world-we-rise/ to create a parade of people in support of social justice for women. Sister Urmila https://www.worldpulse.com/en/community/users/urmila-chanam/posts/34846 is bringing her menstrual hygiene campaign to the parade event.

I would love to have you and a group join us in support of your efforts.

Odion Anavhe
Mar 14, 2015
Mar 14, 2015

O Yvette,

Thank you for your kind words. I would very much love to be involved in what you are planing. Just let me know how. You can mail me details on how to get invovled.

Regards,

Odion

Lisa Anderson
Mar 15, 2015
Mar 15, 2015

So well said, Aisha! What powerful statements you offer, and how spot-on your insight is! I love your line that "Together, we can make it happen for young girls and women." It's so important that we keep in mind the many different circumstances women and girls are born into around the world, and make sure we maintain this consciousness in striving for everyone's human rights.

Warm regards,

Lisa

Odion Anavhe
Mar 15, 2015
Mar 15, 2015

Dear Lisa,

Thanks for your comment. Yes, together we can...

Regards,

Odion

Kristina M
Mar 19, 2015
Mar 19, 2015

As I read your post, I thought of a quote I read about a year ago.  "Be the person you needed when you were younger."  I think if more of us tried to live up to that, we would not only empower countless girls and young women, more of the world would be experiencing these human rights.

Odion M Anavhe
Mar 23, 2015
Mar 23, 2015

Very true Kristina.