How High a Mountain Should a Garbage Dump Rise Before Action Is Taken?

Phionah Musumba
Posted December 18, 2015 from Kenya
 Accumulation of fresh produce garbage at the Muthurwa Market in Nairobi, Kenya.
A lady trader adds her own garbage to the decomposing dump.
A lady trader adds her own garbage to the decomposing dump. (1/1)

It has been a tough two months for traders at the populous Muthurwa Market in Nairobi County of Kenya, what with having to endure the discomfort of working next to a mountain of garbage.

Their pleas to the Nairobi County Council for redemption from the eyesore, not to mention the stench and threat to their own and customers' health has been falling on deaf ears.

When contacted about the menace, the county office levelled all the blame on an undisclosed private company that was contracted to undertake garbage collection. They also disclosed that said company had been paid quite a tidy sum of money three days prior to being questioned, which exenorates the county office, cleanly.

Regardless of who is to blame about the filthy situation, something needs to be done about the garbage dump, and fast. The dump accumulates on a daily basis because the garbage is made of fresh produce which decomposes fast. This is posing a serious threat to not only the fresh produce vendors, but every one else who passes through the market.

It is an epidemic in the making. The whole place is full of maggots and huge flies that hatch from said maggots. The stench is also dangerous to inhale on a regular basis, for the trades within the market, and the customers they serve.

Here is hoping that someone somewhere does their job to literally save the lives of Nairobians.

Comments 4

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Nusrat Ara
Dec 21, 2015
Dec 21, 2015

Where does the garbage come from? If it is all biodegradable can't it be converted into compost? Should there be a better system be evolved to deal with the waste? These are some questions which cropped in my mind Phionah.

What do you think?

Phionah Musumba
Jan 09, 2016
Jan 09, 2016

75% of the garbage is biodegradable, and indeed , systems are in place to deal with the waste. The traders are even charged a daily garbage collection fee, only that the garbage never gets collected. To answer your question about what I think, I would advocate for the traders to take tackle the waste themselves, forget the County Council. This would work.

Tamarack Verrall
Dec 28, 2015
Dec 28, 2015

This is such a sad situation for the people whose health is put in danger, and for the waste, as Nusrat points out, that this pile could be taken to a place where it can be composted to new earth. Passing the buck between a company who has stolen the money, and a Government resopnsible to its citizens is causing terrible and unecessary pain. I hope that public pressure soon prevails. Thanks for writing about this. The dumping of garbage is going on in so many communities globally.

Best wishes for a solution fast,

Tam

Phionah Musumba
Jan 09, 2016
Jan 09, 2016

Thanks for your comment, Tam. As I mentioned above, I believe that the garbage would be best tackled by the traders themselves, away from the County Council.

Thanks again.

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