The place of a woman in an internally displaced family in anglophone Cameroon.

Queen Glory
Posted November 9, 2018 from Cameroon

It breaks my heart to see the sufferings of the internally displaced persons in former British Cameroons. Most painful is the sufferings of mothers in this families. I'm talking out of first hand experience. My parents were forced to leave our village of Ngie to the city of Bamenda. They now live in one apartment, my father, mother, niece, nephew and my aunty Esther and her two kids. In all, they are 7 of them in the house. My father is grieved that he is an internally displaced person and so does little to assist the family. He supports with feeding just when he feels like. But my mum carries the burden of running the house on a daily base all the times. She buys food, pays water and light bills and takes care of health bills as well. The little I put in to assist her is appreciated but deep down, I feel her agony. After visiting so many homes, I see women struggling to sustain their families during this time. I see the enormous pains these women go through to make life better for their families. They hawk anything they can lay hands on. My mum moulded bricks at a construction site. Its heartbreaking what these women go through to sustain themselves and their families while the men fold their hands and do nothing about it. I sincerely wish that all women who read this can make their voices heard by calling on the African Union and the United nations to see into the on going crises of Cameroon and bring a lasting solution to the problems. These internally displaced women should be empowered so that they can cope with life in the cities. These women are farmers or petite traders back in the villages where they came from. They got almost all their foods and vegetables from their farms. But now, they are in cities where everything is being bought. While praying that the Authorities concern bring a lasting solution so that things can go back to normal, these women should be empowered to sustain themselves and their families for the time being. And all these pressure these women go through might affect their health in the future. 

Comments 10

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Lisbeth
Nov 09, 2018
Nov 09, 2018

Hi Glory,
This is the norm nowadays, everywhere men are now reluctant about their responsibilities.
Honestly, its not Godly. Thanks for sharing your story.
Greeting from Ghana
Lisbeth

Queen Glory
Nov 09, 2018
Nov 09, 2018

Thank you Lisbeth. Its so disheartening how some African men treat their families. The pressure on women is just too much. I wonder if these men need classes on responsibility.

Jill Langhus
Nov 10, 2018
Nov 10, 2018

Hi Queen,

Thanks for sharing your sad post. I'm glad your family is safe and well, but I hear you about how discouraging and sad the current situation is there. Have you gotten in touch with Sally who is helping the displaced persons there? Perhaps you can collaborate and help more people through collaboration. Please keep us posted on your progress.

Hope you have a safe/good day, dear.

Tarke Edith
Dec 17, 2018
Dec 17, 2018

Hello Queen
What a terrible situation we find ourselves in sister some men don't just want to support the women. Well let's keep on praying maybe things will be better thanks for sharing our problem on this platform

otahelp
Mar 06
Mar 06

Surely Queen it does affect them later in life. my pain in all this is that women are not still given their rightful with all their efforts. we are getting there and will surely get there. AU and UN will surely hear from us. World Pulse is here to support us get to them. thank you for sharing

Anita Kiddu Muhanguzi

Hi Glory,
Thank you for sharing this very touching story about the plight of women in Cameroon especially your mother. Its true that these women need to be empowered economically to be able to sustain themselves.
Thank you for your story once again.

Gladys Muthara
Mar 20
Mar 20

Dear Queen,

You have a beautiful name!

Thank you so much for highlighting the plight of women in Cameroon, particularly so, using the deeply personal example of your mum. That's a lot of courage. I wish you, your mum, dad, all in your family safety and strength during these trying times.
You are a strong woman Queen, so is your mum. Do you think you and your mum can form a welfare group to support those women you referred to, even as we wait for African Govts to do something about ending the war in Anglophone Cameroon? The world can be changed by you and I through our tiny positive actions.
Again, you are very strong. Thanks for speaking on behalf of your people. That is leadership! Blessings always

sujata gopal
Apr 14
Apr 14

Hi Queen. This is indeed very sad story especially when the man of the house does not shoulder his responsibilities. Hats off to your mother for taking on the responsibility of running the house individually.
This strong women need to be empowered to be able to run their families.
Your mum and you are indeed very strong. Thank you for sharing your story and speaking on behalf of Cameroon women.
Love - Sis Sujata

Tamarack Verrall
May 07
May 07

Dear Queen,
Being able to read news of what you and so many are going through right now in Cameroon is so important. I want to reinforce what Otahelp wrote. A number of us are trying to get our own countries/news services/the UN to pay attention to what is going on in Cameroon. It is only through you and other World Pulse sisters that we are getting the real news. My heart is with you, your mother and all the strong women there.
Love,
Tam

SIMON MUREU
May 13
May 13

KEEP ON IN THIS aFRICA COUNTRY AND FIGHT ON