Asha ( Hope)

Rathin Bhattacharjee
Posted February 17, 2018 from India

Asha ( HOPE) Kushal Babu cursed his unlucky stars the day his eldest child, a daughter, was born. He had been a good son. His parents were proud of him and must have blessed him profusely for being such a loving and caring son. He spent whatever little time he had with his ailing mother after work, he was a clerk working for HTC,  a reputed construction company, and she dotted on her son. His life was peaceful and happy, though a little uneventful as well. Kushal Babu thanked his late parents and sincerely believed that he couldn't have led a happier life without the blessings of his parents. "These things," he would tell his wife, Labonya Devi, "I mean, parents blessings and such stuff, count a lot. I've been a good son. When my first baby is born, it will be a baby boy. He'll grow up to be a healthy, intelligent and strong one like his father and take care of us as well." "Whether it is a boy or girl, it makes a little difference to me," said Labonya, who was into the seventh month of her pregnancy and therefore, glowing in health and spirit. " All I wish and pray for is that the child will be normal and healthy. Naturally, when a daughter was born, Kushal Babu was devastated. He had hoped for and was sure that his first born would be a son, by the blessings of God and his late parents. The birth of a daughter was a great shock. He even lost faith in his parents blessings for a while. What good would a daughter be in the twenty second century world when boys were ruling the world? A daughter born to him of all people? Why is God so unfair? Why was a daughter born to him? Can a daughter lift her parents up if she finds him fallen on someplace, on the floor or in the bathroom floor like it happened to Mr. Snigdha Sen, his neighbour? His only son, Dwipan, lifted him up in his gym-propelled arms and rushed his father to the central hospital without even bothering to inform the so called relatives. Mr. Snigdha survived the heart attack mainly due to the speedy action of his son. And can a daughter ever be as good in sports and games like Mr. Singh's son, Amrit?  The boy was creating waves in the football fields these days. Recently, he was recruited by a Premier League club in England. The first Indian player to have the honour. And what about the money he was going to fetch his parents? Amrit's initial contract with that Club, what's the name, Manchester City or something,  was worth a whooping 5 millions pounds! God! The Singhs will die a peaceful death because of a son like him. Besides, boys are far more serious and studious than the girls. So, a boy is more likely to succeed in life than a girl. God had been really unfair to him. He ought to have had a son. Anyway, life has to go on. A daughter too has to be educated, especially in the context of the 22nd century world. Kushal Babu's daughter, Asha, also was sent to a very ordinary, nameless school. You have to give credit to the girl that despite very little support from his father, she turned out to be a brilliant student at school. Her scholarships ensured that Kushal Babu wouldn't have to worry about her studies. What was even more surprising was that hers was a natural talent in games and sports. When Asha was in the tenth standard, the coach of the local cricket club came to him with a proposal.  Entally Sporting Club would take care of Asha, do all it could to sponsor her education and all provided Kushal Babu agreed to let her play for the club. And as a token of security the club would pay her 36 thousand rupees per year, which was to increase based on her performance in the local, regional and national level tournaments. Asha showed no interest whatsoever.  She had already decided to dedicate herself to the suffering millions by being a doctor. Kushal Babu's heart was broken on that day for the second time. He was not getting any younger and to be offered a contract worth 36 thousand rupees a year, that too at her age! The girl was crazy to have turned down the offer just like her mother did many years ago. Labonya Devi was said to be a brilliant athlet brfore her marriage to Kushal Babu but she seemed happy being a home maker after marriage. When he retired a few years back, the last salary he drew was Rs.12,975! Immature girl. She will have lots to regret in life. It was a weekday. Asha was getting ready to go to the National Medical College for her internship, when she heard someone groaning in the only bedroom in their house on the first floor. Thinking something was wrong with her father, Asha ran up the stairs to get there. Her father was lying near the bed, in a helpless condition, immobile.  Father always refused any offers of help from the her. But this time she didn't care. She ran upto his subconscious body and kneeling down beside him, she even realised that her father was in no state to tell her what to do as he had always done. Asha, having already called the ambulance, got him back on his feet with super humanic efforts. Her efforts at the hospital, where she was very popular as an intern,  saved another father from sure death. These days, Kushal Babu doesn't say anything more about the disadvantages of having a daughter. Asha has her own clinic at the ground floor of the mansion she bought with her own earnings a few years back. She stays on the top floor with the people she loves.  Oh, I forgot to tell you one important fact. Asha has recently given birth and yes, she couldn’t have been more delighted with her daughter than her father is nowadays. The End.

This post was submitted in response to You Are a Silence Breaker..

Comments 5

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Rathin Bhattacharjee
Feb 17, 2018
Feb 17, 2018

My daughter's tutor asked me to help her write a story based on the popular Bengali saying "Jay randhay,  see chul o bandhay", meaning  a girl that cooks can be expected to be good at amything like hair designing and all. It refers to the constantly on-the-rise status of the girl in the society.

Let me congratulate and celebrate the contributions of women across the globe in trying to make our world a better, brighter place to stay in.

With love and regards, 

R.N.Bhattacharjee.

Olutosin
Feb 17, 2018
Feb 17, 2018

WOW what a beautiful story, I was glued to the story from the beginning to the end. I must share this story with my daughters. 

Thanks for writing . I am happy for Asha and her mother.

Rathin Bhattacharjee
Feb 17, 2018
Feb 17, 2018

Dear  Madam alutosin,

Thank you for the encouragement. Means a lot to me. Such appreciation keeps me going and helping me believe in my dream of making a difference as a writer. Let me know what I can do to contribute to women empowerment and the enrichment of their lives.

With warm regards,

Sincerely, 

R.N.Bhattacharjee 

Olutosin
Feb 17, 2018
Feb 17, 2018

You are very welcome.  We are friends already and that is amazing. Your voice is a perfect contribution for women empowerment , you are a perfect role model.

Thanks for your speaking out.

Juliet Acom
Jan 06
Jan 06

Wow!
Kudos to Asha for breaking barriers!

Thanks for sharing!