Nanyonga Rehema: Celebrating and uplifting Girl In Real Life

Rebecca R
Posted April 22, 2013 from Uganda
Remy with one of her mentees, Sanyu
Remy with one of her mentees, Sanyu
Remy with one of her mentees, Sanyu (1/1)

Nanyonga Rehema is an extraordinary petite girl of just 20 years. She usually wears tank tops with ankle-high hip hop colourful shoes and carries a small black satchel. She is known as Remy. Remy lost her mother at nine years, to HIV/AIDS. “I never saw my father,” she says of the other parent. At sixteen, living with an auntie in Nsambya, she was introduced to hip hop through the Break Dance Project Uganda. “I had been suppressed.” She found freedom and friendship on the dance stage and now dances to empower other girls.

Her auntie sent her away from the home. She could not tolerate a girl that danced, a girl that interacted with boys. “She thought I had sex with them. Many women in the family had got pregnant at an early age.” Without a home again, she was lucky to find an old friend who would take her in. “An old, old friend let me stay at her place.” This “old, old friend” is not a person she had known for a long time, but rather an older woman in the community who gave her shelter. Remy would gather girls around the community to teach them dance, listen to their stories and help them with their homework (for those that went to school). She was just 16 and going door to door, talking to parents and explaining her passion. Some parents understood, some did not care while others did not get it. Regardless, every day, little girls in Nsambya told their caretakers “I am going to Remy’s.” At “Remy’s”, she helped them with their work and she taught them to dance. Most of the girls were not in school.

In October 2012, she decided to turn it into a formal project calling it Girl Be Project. “That was not really the name of the group. It was something that I always said to myself. “Girl Be.” That’s why it is not “girls”. It was my mantra,” she explains. In Girl Be, it now stands for “Girl In Real Life Breaking”. She turned it into a full-fledged project because the original informal setting had exposed her to more girls who shared her story. “I am not the only girl who had to drop out of school. I am not the only girl who lost her parents. And, other girls like to dance.” She met more school drop-outs and young mothers, and she wanted to create the structured program for them.

Remy says that Girl Be Project has about fifty beneficiaries. “We have so far been able to buy school requirements for them all.” The girls have tried to do arts and crafts for money, but most of the time they are short. In these cases, Remy covers the costs through her personal ventures. “I do laundry for people. I also get money from dance performances and from friends,” she elaborates.

The group was also able to find sponsors for three girls who can now go to school. Remy was also able to enroll into Institute of Advanced Leadership in Nsambya where she studies Community Psychology. About the course, she simply says, “It is my dream.” Her eyes shine when she says this and even when she doesn’t say anything more, her soft voice and intense look says everything. She has just finished her first semester and does not even know where she will get the UGX 450,000 for next semester’s tuition. “I had a lady who helped me but she stopped,” she says, before she adds that she is not worrying about it because all she can do is “exploit the present and the future will take care of itself.” She wants to help as many girls as she can. And even with her own education in balance, she expanded her project into another economically-deprived area, Namuwongo on 15th April. Twelve girls, aged 14-20 years, showed up for the launch. Twelve girls will find friendship in dance and in their petite mentor.

As an orphan, she had to fund her own education and as a girl devoted to her community, Remy has found more girls like her and through dance and helping with homework, she has overcome barriers for them. She found confidence and a reason to be in dance. She mentors and gives the same confidence to girls. To meet and know Remy is to come face-to-face with a human version of everything our community should be. She is the more aware, the stronger and the better version of us.

Girls Transform the World 2013

Comments 7

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Klaudia
Apr 23, 2013
Apr 23, 2013

The moments I enjoy the most is when I just dance along myself, just like when I was three and you don´t care if there is music or not, or if your movements are delicate or aesthetic. You just feel joy in your soul. I can perfectly picture Remy dancing with her soul and how her joyfulness impacts the lifes of many Remys. Life would bring a better life for all us. Thanks for sharing a beautiful story!!! Klaudia

Rebecca R
Apr 24, 2013
Apr 24, 2013

Dance is associated with feeling joyful. And I like the picture you create of little Remys dancing. I am going to hold onto that one.

Becky

libudsuroy
Apr 24, 2013
Apr 24, 2013

HI, Rebecca! I am awed by Remy's example and by dance's redeeming, life-saving grace for many girls! I am floored by the seeming effortlessness of her ambition and commitment to help girls survive girlhood with good memories and education. Thank you for a great story of a role model.

Rebecca R
Apr 24, 2013
Apr 24, 2013

"Floored" is the right word for the feeling Remy leaves you with. Speaking with her left me in tears- tears of amazement, ofcourse. I have met many women but she moved me more than any other. That is why I really wanted to have her story told, for this assignment. Because when I think "Girls Transform our World", she is that girl. The one that transforms our world. I know she transformed mine.

-Becky

Prudence Chinemu Phiri
Apr 24, 2013
Apr 24, 2013

Great story so touching. Remy's story is not different from many girls in societies world over. But I admire her courage to turn the worst into the best. There is no soul soothing and stress relief like dancing, I can picture her dancing all her energy out. Unfortunately society thinks if you dance then you a prostitute. Go Remy, Go Rabecca, we are behind you

Rebecca R
Apr 24, 2013
Apr 24, 2013

It is unfortunate that the world sees dance in such a demeaning light. It continues to distance us from our (beautiful, beautiful) bodies. I hope our society can find a way to bridge the gap that exists between dance and women. For girls like Remy.

Katharina
Apr 26, 2013
Apr 26, 2013

Fantastic story, you shared here Rebecca! As the others wrote above, you way of describing Remy made it so easy for me to really picture her and to get a good grasp of her amazing and inspirational story. It is great that you captured it. Thank you so much!