A rosary trip from Damascus to Warsaw

Samia Al sayed
Posted September 22, 2020 from Syrian Arab Republic
Samia & Dr. Daria in Lebanon
Rosaries Handcraft by Sinnaraty Work group
Rosaries Handcraft by Sinnaraty Work group (1/2)

 

When women unite, the impossible becomes possible

I do not want to repeat what Syria is going through in terms of crises which started 10 years ago, especially after the Covid-19 crisis, which made all matters worse. We are a group of Syrian women inside Syria trying to improve our economic situation and take care of our families doing Handcrafts. We established a group for manual labor called SINNARATY (www.facebook.com/sinnaraty). The group includes women of all ages, social and cultural levels, among them internally refugees, and the majority of those have lost their homes and moved to other places inside Syria. Each woman of us specializes in a specific type of art, traditional and kind of handicraft that tries to apply the theme of sustainability in her work. Whether in terms of local raw materials or in terms of securing a fair and permanent income for the craftsmen (from producer to consumer). Today we face several problems, the most important of which is the boycott imposed on us, and because of which we were greatly affected and we can no longer secure our families' sustenance. We can no longer market our products.  Internally due to the high price of raw materials. Externally, due to our inability to export these products.

Since I do not want to shed light on the negative things only, this is the most wonderful experience, whose story was woven by a group of benevolent and helpful women. The good thing about this story is that I, through several friends, managed to send several ROSARIES hand-made by our group for sale abroad. One of my friends called Nour Stall from German sold me a set of these rosaries at a very good price last year. The second set was sent to Germany as well, but due to Covid-19, my dear friend Nour was not able to sell them.

After several months, due to other project I was in contact with another wonderful friend called Dr. Daria Mejnartowicz who lives in Warsaw, Poland. She is also VVLEAD Fellowship Alumna.

23 rosaries were sent to her from German and within 3 days they were all sold out by Daria in a very good price also (her Polish friends knowing about hard situation in Syria paid 5-50 USD for a piece).

We have crossed the boundaries and made the impossible. A group of philanthropic people helped Syrian women and instilled hope in them by contributing to the sale of these products. Again, as during Daria’s philanthropic project for the Syrian refugees in Lebanon we met and Daria bought set of several different items for her friends in Poland.

Thank you Nour, thank you Daria and thank you to everyone who bought a piece of our products, which was made with love. It tells a story worthy of being told and sheds light on the Syrian people, whose ordeal will end soon.

 

Refugees have skills and talents that only need a chance to grow and flourish. Within each piece lies a story of history and culture, and the chance for a person who has fled war and persecution to offer something of beauty and style to the world.

Filippo Grandi

UN High Commissioner For Refugees

 

 

 

Comments 8

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Hello, Samia,

Welcome back to World Pulse! It's great to hear from you. We missed you! Why was a boycott imposed on your products, dear? That's so sad to know.

It's great to know that sending rosaries to other nations become an alternative source of income for you. It's lovely to see how women are working together across shores. Thank you for this inspiring update.

I agree that refugees have skills and talents! May there be more doors open before you so you all may grow and flourish. Please stay safe.

Samia Al sayed
Sep 23
Sep 23

Dear Karen,
Thank you for your nice words.
The boycott is supposed to be against the regime, but the reality is that the people are affected a lot , and today the salary that we get is barely enough for several days, with the great shortage of foodstuffs and the high price of their prices, which has doubled 100 times. Car fuel is in short supply . Medical and sanitary supplies are at a minimum also. The majority of creative and distinguished people have emigrated. We are banned from traveling and we do not obtain a visa except to a number of countries that do not exceed the fingers of one hand. It is forbidden to import goods, especially raw materials, and as they enter by the black market , that increases their price. People inside Syria do not have their daily sustenance, so handicrafts have become a luxury. This is a small part of our reality that we Syrians inside , and therefore selling our products abroad brings us a decent income and helps many women who became the sole breadwinner for the family after the death or injury of her husband due to the war.
I hope that give you a small spot on our situation.

Poleth
Sep 23
Sep 23

What you is so courageous and I admire you for that, all the woman working trying to get through this situation the best way they can, I wish Allah bless you with the resources you need to keep your families and yourself safe and happy. You deserve it :)

Samia Al sayed
Sep 23
Sep 23

Thank you my dear for your nice feelings.

Jill Langhus
Sep 23
Sep 23

Hello Lovely Samia,

Welcome back, dear! Thanks so much for sharing your update and initiative. I'm glad you have some good friends to help you out. What is VVLEAD?

It's lovely to see your update and your positivity. It's amazing given the hardship you're enduring. You rock:-)

XX

Jill Langhus
Sep 25
Sep 25

Oh, okay. I didn't realize you were part of the Vital Voices program.

Cool:-)

Hope you have a good, safe weekend, dear.

XX

Nini Mappo
Sep 24
Sep 24

Hello Samia,
Yours is the first ever first person account from someone in Syria I have ever read. I admire your resilience, and the resilience of all the women you work with. I love the closing statement, that refugees are offering something of beauty to the world. That artwork is beautiful, I love all perfect little the details that showcase the skill and patience of the artist.
I can only pray that the situation improves for your art to get to the markets it needs.