Spiritual question

taneross
Posted March 20, 2019 from United States

I have wondered about this for some time. Here in the west, many western women like to engage in spiritual practices that are similar to spiritual practices found around the world. While many women will go and participate with an established spiritual practice, such as Zen Buddhism, and learn from a teacher or master who has studied. However, others  invent their own spiritual practice that is similar to, say, Zen Buddhism, and then go out and teach their practice to others. We see this alot with yoga teachers but now it's branching out into more spiritual realms. I guess this has always been true with the New Age spirituality centers that have been around for a while.  What do you think about that, making up similar practices and then teaching it to other people?

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SIMON MUREU
Mar 21
Mar 21

We all have right to worship either way.When I wash doing my chaplaincy program,I did anumber of world religion and is interesting

Jill Langhus
Mar 21
Mar 21

Hi Taneross,

Welcome to World Pulse:-) Thanks for sharing your intriguing, and thought-provoking post. Personally, I think if a particular religion, spiritual practice, or off-shoot of one resonates for someone, and they are a good person that is kind, compassionate and has integrity then I don't have a problem with it. I would say whatever they are practicing is working for them. What are your thoughts on the topic?

Looking forward to seeing more posts from you.

Hope you have a great day!

taneross
Mar 21
Mar 21

I agree, and you hit on the essential quality that, at least for me, is required: integrity. Here in the US, there is a lot of conversation with people of color (non European-Americans) around the effects of colonialism and historical white supremacy. Part of that conversation is questioning if appropriating parts of an-"other's" culture by someone not from that culture is an act of colonialism. The feeling is that European-American's pick and choose what they want to take at their whim and that taking something as sacred as spiritual practice and then turning it around and forming a business or profiting from it when it's not part of your culture, is modern colonialism.

Jill Langhus
Mar 21
Mar 21

Hi there,

I see. Thanks for the clarification on what prompted your post. Yeah, I don't agree with that viewpoint, personally, i.e., about it basically being a capitalistic marketing ploy that denigrates other cultures, religions or spiritual practices. It's not harming anyone, and if it's making them, and others better human beings, then I don't see anything wrong with it. To me it's just another example of how mixed, and diverse all of our cultures are now. I see that as a beautiful thing.

Kay Link
Mar 21
Mar 21

You both make some great points. Seeing cultures as being 'owned' or own-able is very capitalistic in nature that is commodifying it. Cultural appropriation is often associated with a price tag that detracts from the spiritual, cultural, and social value of a practice. Perhaps the balance is respectful appreciation and participation. For instance, I have never walked into a place of worship for any religion where I have not been welcomed and encouraged. As long as a person comes from a place of respect and appreciation, people are able to adopt the practices/thoughts/ideas they resonate with without cheapening the culture/religion/ practice they are borrowing inspiration from.

Jill Langhus
Mar 22
Mar 22

Hi Kay:-)

How are you doing?

Thanks for your valuable feedback. It's a very interesting, and deep, conversation, this one:-) I agree that respect and appreciation definitely helps for each religious or spiritual practice, for sure.

Hope you're having a great day!

Kaity Van Riper
Mar 21
Mar 21

I like this question. I think a lot can be learned from others. For example, I'm a Christian, but there's a lot I get out of yoga or meditation. I can also respect fasting and praying throughout the day like many Muslim people do.
There's so many ways we can use our bodies, hearts and minds to glorify and communicate with the Creator or Divine. I think that's universal.

The problems, as i see it, come into play when people manipulate and corrupt beautiful spiritual beliefs to justify hate and violence, which happens again and again. I also see a problem with people making things up and teaching it to others when the student thinks it comes from some higher authority. As long as the student understands it is from the mind of said person, then ok. For example, if someone, say Andrew,makes up a religion and people follow it knowingly all is fine, but if people believe they are following Jesus or Mohammed and are really follow Andrew, then it's just deceitful.

Beth Lacey
Mar 30
Mar 30

I think it's ok if it's for a greater good and not trying to exploit money or other things from people. I believe the more spirituality we have in the world, the more love and peace we will all find.

Jane
Aug 29
Aug 29

I believe everyone has a right to do or practice what it feels right to them without feeling ashamed or pressured by anyone around them of which that could look like you doing things out of peer pressure and I guess if you do anything out of peer pressure with no benefit to or for you that will mean you pleasing others instead of yourself. We all come from different background and different religions and beliefs and we must adhere to that without worrying about "who says what" as long as we not practicing which craft where people are killed and mutilised but living in a society where there is love and peace moreover respect of each other, the world would be a better place to worry about our different practices

Gulzaib Tareen
Sep 09
Sep 09

Human Beings are combination of matter and spirit, which are required to be nurtured by both. Every religion or practice of spirituality prevails because it considers the spiritual aspect as food available in market for our human body.