Together with Rural Women in Environmental Sustainability

TataWirba
Posted January 29, 2020 from Cameroon
Together with
Together with : Women in Environmental Sustainability (1/1)

Across Cameroon and other African countries, women play critical roles in relation to their natural environment. Often deeply dependent on available natural resources for food, fuel and shelter, women can be particularly vulnerable to environmental changes or threats. Because women’s workload is often centered on managing natural resources, biodiversity and ecosystems, their experiences and perspectives are essential to sustainable development  policy making and actions at every level, for a healthy planet for generations to come.

Women in Cameroon in particular and developing world at large are predominantly responsible for management and conservation of resources for their families. Women spend vast amounts of time collecting and storing water, securing sources of fuel, food and fodder, and managing land  be it  forest, wetlands or agricultural lands. As women are primary caregivers to children, the elderly and the sick, whole communities rely on them and yet gender inequality persist. Their traditional and generational knowledge of biodiversity, for example, supplies communities with medicines, nutritional balance and crop rotation methods. When drought, erratic rainfall or severe storms affect access to these basic resources, women’s lives  and their families’ lives  can be intensely affected as the case of Cameroon and Africa. In fact, studies have shown that natural disasters disproportionately hit women, lowering female life expectancy rates and killing more women than men, especially where levels of gender equality are low as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (1979), an international “bill of rights” for women, addressing the host of environmental issues is not being respected.

Women constitute just over half the world’s population, but women are responsible for feeding much of it  especially in rural slumps of developing countries. Women produce between 60 and 80 percent of food in developing countries  and yet they officially own only 2 percent of land worldwide, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Historical inheritance laws and customs often prohibit or limit women’s direct control over land as the case of Cameroon and Africa; even when women are able to own and lease land, they may not be able to secThe Role of Women in the Sustainabilityure  loans or insurance to keep their resources safe. The lack of equitable land rights remains a major obstacle to women’s empowerment and poverty alleviation and  the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (1979), an international “bill of rights” for women, addressing the host of environmental issues is not being respected.  ~Tata~

Comments 13

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Tarke Edith
Jan 29
Jan 29

Hello Tata
I love you concern about women and girls .
Thanks for sharing dear
Where are you based in Cameroon .?
I am in Bamenda .

TataWirba
Jan 29
Jan 29

Hi Tarke.
I hope you are doing ok. I am in Bamenda as of now
Thanks
Tata

Anita Shrestha
Jan 30
Jan 30

Wow Tata
I am also background of forestry sothat plantation is great for me.
Keep going on active guy

TataWirba
Jan 30
Jan 30

Thank you very much Anita. With time we shall be able to work on site if God wills.
Love and blessings
Tata

Mercy Vernyuy Munyuy

Wow Tata, thank you for supporting women's course.i have always known you to be a great advocate for women rights. keep up

TataWirba
Jan 30
Jan 30

Thank you Mercy. We are in to this together for you are my source of inspiration. I am glad meeting you here in World Pulse where women voices are being heard. Looking forward for future cooperation with you.
Keep inspiring
Love and blessings
Tata

Anita Kiddu Muhanguzi

Dear Tata,

How are you. I love your passion for uplifting women and girls. I pray that you will encourage more men to support women and girls especially those in your communities. This can be a way of reducing gender based violence. I realized through experience that when men are involved in these trainings they feel involved and included in the projects.

Thank you so much for the work that you are doing and looking forward to more of your updates.

TataWirba
Jan 30
Jan 30

Thank you very much for the encouragement Anita. Surely they will for time as I usually say is "time is an evolution and as it evolves values remodel themselves and give life a significant meaning". Fight against Gender and GBV is of great importance to me. I can't succeed with this alone. I have to team up with sisters to see into it that this is a successful fight.
Thank you Anita and I shall be bringing you updates in subsequent days.
Love and blessings
Tata

Jill Langhus
Jan 31
Jan 31

Hi Tata,

Thanks for sharing this information. What is this "bill of rights?" There's an international one? Hmm. What could be done now to reinforce these rights?

laison sylvie
Feb 04
Feb 04

My dear brother, I can say I am actually wearing your shoe and I know exactly what you are saying. I work with women in Bamenda Cameroon and all these realities abound. We have to strategies to inteven in the making of laws a d policies affecting our Cameroonian women.

TataWirba
Feb 04
Feb 04

Hi Laison. Thank you for bringing up supporting fact by standing not just as a witness but a colleague facing the same challenges in the field. Yes together we can tackle the problems and make sure we put an end to all these.
I look forward for team work.
Love and blessings
Tata

laison sylvie
Feb 04
Feb 04

Absolutely my brother. You will sure be added to our world pulse Bamenda WhatsApp group so we can network for a better.

TataWirba
Feb 04
Feb 04

Thank you Laison. I look forward for the add.