Echo location- Bliss of my solitude

Tiffany Brar
Posted August 7, 2018 from India

As a blind person I was always told to shut my mouth, as I was blind and it was not possible for a blind person to know anything or to even utter a syllable.  Those were the days when I was small! So I went in to my shell of silence, I started enjoying the bliss of solitude.   It was an indescribable bliss. A bliss which I found in myself,  sometimes I would hear  the sound of birds, crows, and also  had an imaginary friend, to enable me to escape from my silence  at the times when I really felt lonely, bug most times I was content hearing the sounds provided by nature, and finding beauty and happiness in them.

I then tried to walk on the grass and find my way in the silent gardens.

I started enjoying the sounds of silence, but also the sound of nature, the winds, the birds, the wind chimes ringing from people’s homes, especially in the hills of Darjeeling when I was twelve years old.  Then I realized that I needed some sound in this dreary silence. So I started clicking my fingers and clapping my hands and also making clicking noises with my tongue. I was surprised when I could actually identify whether I was near an obstacle and whether I was facing danger such as a pit, a hole, and so on!

 After growing up, I learned from some wise friends that this was called echolocation and was invented by a wise blind man in the US called Daniel Kish. So finally, I was convinced that my clicking was not just for fun. It was actually something that blind people did to identify their surroundings. I started doing this more and more, and gradually I began to identify obstacles by their height like cars, trees, plants etc.

It is a beautiful unique aspect of orientation and mobility, which I now take pleasure in imparting to my students. I often tell them what led me to this and it is indeed fascinating.

 

 

 

Website: www.jyothirgamayaindia.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/jyothirgamaya

Comments 8

Log in or register to post comments
Jill Langhus
Aug 07, 2018
Aug 07, 2018

Hi Tiffany,

Thanks for sharing your insightful and fascinating story about echolocation. I hadn't heard that term before. I had always heard that blind people had exceptional other sensory skills, such as hearing, so this is awesome clarification for me.

Hope you're having a great day:)

Tiffany Brar
Aug 07, 2018
Aug 07, 2018

Hi ji.,,echo location is the best way for identifying obstacles and we become more independent by this method...
Thanks for your supporting comments ..
Have a wonderful week ahead dear sister..

Jill Langhus
Aug 08, 2018
Aug 08, 2018

Yes, I would imagine that it's an invaluable resource:-)

You're very welcome.

You, too!!!

Stephanie Mah
Aug 07, 2018
Aug 07, 2018

Hi Tiffany, nice to hear from you again, people may say you are blind,but can't see what you see,they can't know what you know, that is the doing of God.

Tiffany Brar
Aug 07, 2018
Aug 07, 2018

Thanks stephanie,
Breaking the sterotypos and traditional barriers for blind ,especially in,communication is the most challenging thing for,me.
It is the ECHO LOCATION that helped me a lot.

Thanks for your voice sister..
Have a great day ahead.

Tamarack Verrall
Aug 09, 2018
Aug 09, 2018

Dear Tiffany,
What a beautiful story. Echolocation is a new concept for me, too. I am glad to know about it. It was also moving to read about how connected to nature you have been from an early age. Your students must learn so much from you. Hopefully too, those people whose prejudices discount the wisdom of people who are different from themselves.

Tiffany Brar
Aug 10, 2018
Aug 10, 2018

Dear Tam,
thanks so much for your supporting words ...
echo location makes a blind to be more independent and get close to nature as you said..
loves and prayers for you....

Beth Lacey
Apr 29
Apr 29

A great story