Wisdom Woman

Aimee Knight
Posted March 8, 2018 from United States
St. John's Illuminated Bible, St. Mary's University, Photo by Aimee Knight

Sometimes, when I tell people that my degree is in theology, I notice an interesting reaction. Suddenly, the clouds part and doves descend. A choir breaks out in song. My halo is gleaming. While the person in front of me visibly attempts to put their church personality on as quickly as possible. For just a second, I enjoy the fact that my new friend thinks that I’m an angel walking the Earth and is slightly terrified. What have we been talking about? Was it churchy? I smile to myself and try not to giggle out loud. Let the fun begin, just wait until they get to know me!  

I love theology because it’s an adventure. Like my own “The Librarian” movie series. If you haven’t seen The Librarian, I’m not sure that we can be friends. Indiana Jones kind of exciting? Theology is fun and it’s interesting. Not at all like trying to pay attention in church on Sunday. One of my favorite but most difficult classes was, “Women of the Hebrew Bible”. Guys, at the midterm point, I was certain that I was going to fail. I grew up in a very strict religion and while I’m no longer a part of that faith, the four or five days a week spent studying the scriptures made me feel like I had an advantage. I already knew these scriptures and these stories. This class was going to be a breeze. Did you know that the Latin root word for humble means “dirt”? Yep. Because sometimes being humbled means you find yourself in the dust.

Why was this class so difficult? Patriarchy. My entire life, the scriptures had been read and interpreted to me by an only male clergy and from an only male point of view. That lens was so powerful that it was invisible. I didn’t know that it was there. I could only see the women in these scriptures and stories as the ideal women that I was told they were, wonderful but always subservient to men. I saw them as characters but not necessarily as role models. I was the only girl in two years of high school drafting classes and the only woman in my police academy class. In my life, pursuing my interests, goals, and dreams, meant being rebellious. Not a church-going-like-the-women-in-the-Bible-good-girl. For the second half of the semester, I was determined to break through my ingrained bias and break down the invisible blockade. My adventure was on the other side.

This is what I learned. Many of the women of the Bible are bad-a**es! They have been there for hundreds of years in the pages, waiting to tell us their story. If only we can hear them and see them with a woman’s heart and through a woman’s lens. Is that wrong to do? No. Men wrote the Bible but if you believe that it is inspired by God. God would not allow men to keep good women down. The effects of society and culture on male writers might blur the lens but the words still jump off the page. Read them again and again and again and you will see what I mean. Cool, right?

One of my favorite examples is of Miriam. I had always heard the scripture read, “Then Miriam the Prophet, Aaron’s sister.” Oh, okay. Aaron was a prophet and she was his sister. I’ve heard it a thousand times. But read it again, Exodus 15:20, “Miriam the Prophet, Aaron’s sister.” If patriarchy is blocking your brain, read it again until you see that Miriam is the Prophet! What?! Well, that changes things. Aaron is just her brother. Word. There are more: Deborah the Judge, Esther the Queen, Ruth & Naomi, and my most favorite of all, Wisdom Woman. The description in Proverbs 8 is beautiful. It begins, “Does not wisdom call out? Does not understanding raise her voice? On the heights beside the way, in the paths she takes her stand; beside the gates in front of the town, at the entrance of the portals she cries aloud." Yes, she does. Next, the crazy cool part, if you read the entire description of Wisdom Woman in Proverbs 8, the words may seem familiar. Where have you read them before? Just for fun, read the description of Jesus’ Divinity in the Gospels and Letters to the Congregations. Keep in mind that the Hebrew Bible or Torah was written before the Gospels or New Testament. Jesus is the Word or the Divine personification of Wisdom. The descriptions are almost identical to the description of Wisdom Woman. Wow, right?

On this International Women’s Day, we can look to the future. Unite our voices to change the world. We will write our own stories and stories will be written about us. When we need inspiration, we can look into the past. Look past the lens of patriarchy. The women are there even if we didn’t see them before, hidden in the pages of Holy Books, and History Books, and Story Books.  Telling us, “Wisdom Women of the World, raise your voices!”  

Comments 19

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  • jlanghus
    Mar 08
    Mar 08

    Hi Aimee. How are you doing? Thanks for sharing some of your story about what you learned. I took a class on Women in Religion, too, and was shocked. I didn't come from a religious background at all, but what I learned in this class was downright shocking and what other women in the class had gone through, too, that had come from strict Catholic upbringings, as well. It's great that you are pointing out the women that hadn't been eradicated from the Bible, though. And, I'm seeing more and more stories about historic, valiant women being brought back into the light. It's so uplifting and inspiring for me to see. I so wish I could've seen all these brilliant role models when I was growing up. What is "The Librarian," btw? I'll have to look this up now:)

  • Valéria Barbosa
    Mar 08
    Mar 08

    Dear sister, thank you for your story.

  • Anne Dupont
    Mar 08
    Mar 08

    Dear Aimee,
    This is a powerful story that reminds me that we all have filters about a variety of things in our lives and it takes a conscious effort to step back and look at things differently! Beautifully written!
    With love,
    Anne

  • Anne McCaw
    Mar 08
    Mar 08

    Aimee: thank you so much for the inspiration. I am a lover of history and story in all forms, and I so appreciate the reminder that we need to dig a little bit deeper, even today, to find the stories of strong, visionary women. But they are everywhere, and we need to hold them in our hearts.

  • Hello, Aimee,

    I searched for women in the Bible, too. They are very few, but like you mentioned they rose up to authority in a culture where women are deemed secondary. Amazing!

    It is interesting to know that at the last part of the Bible is the Bride, a woman clothed with glory and splendor, no longer a subordinate, but co-equal to her Groom.

    Thanks for your insight.

  • Olutosin
    Mar 09
    Mar 09

    My darling sister, thanks so much for reminding us, about these great women. they always want yo try to use the bible to bamboozle me. Ah ah ah I always walk away from those people because I have a copy.
    I do read it and understand it.

  • Debbi Ozborme
    Mar 09
    Mar 09

    Not got time to type much .. but my metaphysical studies drew me to the path of Jesus.. and the way the women were written out of the Bible by the men that wanted control.. and how Mother Mary agreed to it to protect the private future of her reincarnated son. Here is what I learnt.. Mother Mary was The Temple Dove to the order of the Essenes.. she understood the power of the goddess energies and worshiped both energies.. that of God and the Goddess Isis.. there are many ancient texts about how when a woman is pure and in connection with her inner energetics and the angelic realms they can bear holy children by pure spiritual means.. she is Not the only woman to have done so. Jesus was the result of Her studiousness and direct right relations with the higher sources, realms and frequencies on our planet.. she was told he would leave her aged 11 and she took this to mean he would die and endeavoured to pass on her years of spiritual wisdoms so he would have the keys to help his soul stay intact on passing .. (he was to leave her young empowered by her teachings with a hunger for all spiritual knowledge.. not Christian and is revered by All religions) after the resurrection they went to Ephesus back to the Essenes (Mary Magdalene was one of them too) St Paul was sent to insist the 'pagans' turn Christian and negotiate terms .. he saw the magic for himself and studied their wisdoms secretly.. writing the Pauline Arts there which is a secret book on how to control the angelic realms .. he negotiated with Mother Mary and Mary Magdalene.. The Dove of Peace is written into the Bible in honour of the real pure and holy status of The Temple Dove.. the Woman behind the story.. taken by 'Christianity' to manipulate people away from their inner wisdoms and God given magic and make them all servants of the 'Good' book and men that wanted control.. they took the frequencies that harmonised us and used them only in church organs (solpheggio) so people were able to feel a little of that within them in that 'sacred' space.. the book is a metaphor for guidance nothing more. IF we follow the true path of Jesus then women are the first key.. and all religions count. May all that read this be blessed with love and peace of heart. Lots of love xx

  • Jean Forbes
    Mar 09
    Mar 09

    Thank you Thank you. All my life I thought of St Paul as the consummate bigot. Then I learned to put him in context of the time and place in which he functioned. I don't say that I totally love him now, but I am beginning to forge an understanding of him and the way he wrote given his time and place in history.
    Jean

  • Judy Ferran
    May 31
    May 31

    Jean, I am chuckling and loving your phrase regarding "St. Paul as the consummate bigot"! Yes, context of time and place is how to understand persons of history and present. Thank you for your insight!

  • Colleen Abdoulah
    Mar 09
    Mar 09

    RIGHT ON! I too years ago got on a kick of exploring the strong women of the Bible and those that were left out. There were so many writings that did not make 'the cut' and many were written and or about women. It is time. It is long over due for women to take their rightful blessed place in our churches, companies, politics, families etc.
    Well writtten and nicely stated Aimee!
    hugs,
    Colleen

  • Tamarack Verrall
    Mar 10
    Mar 10

    Dear Aimee,

    Thank you so much for this. I am always interested in open discussion about all forms of religion and spirituality, and have ongoing big concerns about how they are being narrowly interpreted to try to control women. Discussion opens the windows wide fr fresh air. Beautifully written.

    In sisterhood,
    Tam

  • Obisakin Busayo
    Mar 11
    Mar 11

    Dear Aimee
    This is a powerful story! Thank you for sharing it with us, Keep sharing!
    Love
    Busayo

  • Vivian Emesowum
    Mar 12
    Mar 12

    Wonderful story from religious angle, well articulated, with WP stories, we may also have a women Bible book.

    Thank you for sharing

  • Jafreen Alamgir
    Mar 15
    Mar 15

    Aimee, Best of luck for following your passion and someday I would love to hear more about your adventure stories. :)

  • Sister Zeph
    Mar 22
    Mar 22

    Wow this is beautiful I have not seen many women talking like this by giving references of the Bible and I totally agree with you actually when it comes to religion men have taken all the charge so of course they intemperate the religion the way they want therefore we woman should not only tell our stories to the world but of our mothers and grandmothers but also we should talk about religious books and should make the men realize that we women are not less then them we have never been, great job my dear

  • Veronica Ngum Ndi
    Apr 02
    Apr 02

    Dear Aimee
    your story is awesome. I am a spiritualist and Like to empower women with disabilities in spirituality. When your take an adventure around your Bible, your spirit is humbled and your inner man is calm.Your ability to think straight is great and your can see clearly your vision.
    Thanks for sharing
    Love Veronica

  • Loreen Meda
    Apr 09
    Apr 09

    Thank you for sharing your insight, and it is exciting to see how much we can change and that God says it is ok.
    Zelophehad's daughters petitioned Moses, Eleazar the priest, the chieftains, and the whole assembly, at the entrance of the Tent of Meeting for their right to inherit their father's property. Challenging the law in the Land of Israel. This kept me going in my own battle, that the girls did not wait for God to say it is ok, they laid a claim and God said they were right. KKKK does it not make you wonder what else you should have or entitled to that you allow to pass.

    Thank you for sharing, you have me excited.

    Awesome

  • kitty
    Apr 17
    Apr 17

    Hi Aimee,
    Thanks for sharing your story! I had similar views as you did at the beginning of your narrative, and quickly learned that just because characters aren't always portrayed in a certain light, doesn't mean that they are really that way. keep up the good work!

  • Judy Ferran
    May 31
    May 31

    Your story is refreshing. Many years ago while I was majoring in psychology and philosophy considering and accepted into a theology school on scholarship, I became interested in women of the Bible and more interested in how their stories are not told even today. Thank you for this memory refreshed!