As women of Zimbabwe, mothers, aunts, grandmothers, guardians, the start of 2009 became so bitter. From being unable to access our cash from the banks, to shortages of basic foodstuffs, those who stocked basic foodstuff charging in United States dollars, South African rand, Botswana pula, and British pound...even public transport now charged in the foreign currencies. The minimum charge for local urban transport got pegged at a dollar, but for may civil servants and others, their full month's salary can only get them about fourty cents on the street, the only place where one can buy foreign currencies.

A few weeks later, we are reeling in shock, and at the unfairness of all this politicking that has landed us in this hot soup. Public schools are now charging exorbitant fees in foreign currency, and still demand that parents buy every item of stationery for their child and teacher. Most high schools, including the ones run by churches have turned children away because they could not pay the foreign currency pegged school fees. The universities are also charging tuition fees that are more than three times the average salaries paid to the few lucky enough to be paid in foreign currency.

Where shall we put our children? What shall we do with them?

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Martha, I'm a student in SA. I have nothing except my hands. I was wondering...what are the possibilities of me volunteering with you in Zim, and what will I be doing?

The possibilities are so many, depends on your area of interest and what you like doing

Regards Martha

The struggle chose me and made me who I am.